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Posts Tagged ‘Lanark County’

Drug to reverse opioid overdose now more accessible to community

Thursday, November 10, 2016 @ 01:11 PM
posted by Tara McNeil

Opioid misuse and overdoses are a growing concern across Canada and the U.S. In Ontario alone, opioids cause one death every 13 hours — and Lanark County is not immune. Twenty-four people in Lanark County have died of opioid misuse since 2010.

As part of a larger harm reduction strategy, on June 24 the province expanded access of naloxone, the drug used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, to pharmacies.

Kits, which contain at least two doses of the drug, needles for injection, arm snappers, gloves, a rescue breathing barrier and a client ID card, can be obtained by eligible recipients free of charge from participating pharmacies. As of Oct. 7, health units were also given the same access.

Eligible recipients include opioid users; anyone with a history of use; and family members, friends or other people in a position to assist a person at risk of overdose from opioids. Kits are given without a prescription.

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit has been distributing naloxone kits since December 2014, but until the Oct. 7 decision, only to members of the community that have a history of opioid use. “We’ve distributed 158 kits. We’ve had 15 kits been used and used successfully,” says Jennifer Adams, registered nurse and harm reduction coordinator at the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit.

Now that friends and family members are able to obtain kits as well from the health unit, it gives more meaning and purpose to the program. “The group that is going to need it is the friends and family,” Adams says.

Because the life-saving drug is injectable, training is given at the same time the kit is distributed. Adams says this could hinder the pharmacy program as sometimes the training takes about 10 minutes, or it can take upwards of an hour — it all depends on the client. At the health unit, clients are taken into a private room, shown how to use the kit and get any questions they might have answered. When picked up at a pharmacy, the level of privacy could be diminished and time limited.

“Harm reduction programs often carry embarrassment and shame. But we have some who don’t care, who are very open about what they do,” she says, adding that the benefit of distributing kits through pharmacies is that pharmacies are often open longer and later than health units.

“It’s a good step in the right direction. It’s coming from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. They are making it a priority,” Adams says. “This is just one step, one part of the solution.”  

Adams notes that, so far, there has been very little negative backlash from the expanded access to naloxone. “The drugs are here, and they are here to say,” she says. “We have a segment of the population that is going to use, despite the treatment out there. If we don’t provide them with the method to save themselves, there is no option for treatment. We are trying to keep them healthy while in their addiction.”

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 11 – 13

Thursday, November 10, 2016 @ 10:11 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 11 – 13

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Remembrance Day Ceremony

11:00am
Join us to honour all Veterans.
Smiths Falls Cenotaph

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12

40 Plus Singles Dinner/Dance

7:00pm
7pm dinner, followed by dance with Blue Thunder at 8pm. Casual dress (no jeans). Cash bar. Call Betty at 613-285-5557, or Wanda or Alice at 613-205-1234. There is music for everyone. You don’t have to be a dancer to enjoy this event; just come and enjoy the evening with people who have similar interests to yours. Cost: $10
Smiths Falls Civitan Hall
12468 Hwy 15 N., Smiths Falls
40plussinglesdanceclub@gmail.com
613-285-5557

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

THE RIDEAU MELLOWDEARS IN SMITHS FALLS

7:00pm
Free Willing Offering
Westminster Presbyterian Church
11 Church St. W., Smiths Falls

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 4 – 6

Wednesday, November 2, 2016 @ 11:11 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 4 – 6

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4

Victim Services Lanark County Drop In

8:30am – 4:00pm
Victim Services Lanark County is a community-based program that provides immediate, confidential short-term crisis intervention services, practical assistance, information, referrals and emotional support to persons affected by crime, tragedy and disaster. Everyone is welcome. Drop in and speak to one of our staff! All services are free, voluntary and confidential.
Carambeck Community Centre
351 Bridge Street, Carleton Place
For more information visit www.victimserviceslanark.ca

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Annual Craft Sale

Join us for our annual craft sale at the Smiths Falls Civitan.
Smiths Falls Civitan
Mary Lou Linton: 613.283.7172
Jeannette Crawford: 613.293.5405

Candy Cane Bazaar & Luncheon

11:00am – 2:00pm
Great Christmas gifts for everyone! Crafts, baking, accessories, jewellery, balloon burst & more.
Free Admission
Luncheon:$6
Trinity United Church Smiths Falls
41 Market St. N.

Dance with the Doherty Brothers

8:00pm – 12:00am (midnight)
Come out for an evening of fun & dance in support of the community pool.
Tickets at Special Greetings, 8 Russell St. E. or The Aquatic Recreation Centre, 361 Queen St.
Gallipeau Centre
361 Queen St.

Art Journey’s Annual Fall Show and Sale

10:00am – 4:00pm
Come meet the artists and shop for some one of a kind creations.
Door prizes to be drawn at the end of show on Sunday.
Live entertainment by Vine Rhymes both days 10 am- 4 pm.
Artists Demos throughout both days- see website for schedule.
Smiths Falls Memorial Community Centre
71 Cornelia St. W.
www.artjourneysmithsfalls.com

35th Annual Art Show & Sale

10:30am – 4:30pm
35th Annual Art Show & Sale, with Christmas Artisan Market – Original works by over 30 local artists. Whether your personal taste leans towards landscapes, still life studies, impressionism or sculpture, you will be surprised and pleased by the wide variety of works available. Come find the perfect Christmas gift for family, friends or yourself!
Heritage House Museum
Carol Miller: 613.283.6311
heritagehouse@smithsfalls.ca
www.facebook.com/HeritageHouseMuseum
www.smithsfalls.ca/heritagehouse

Giant Falls Craft Fair

10:00am – 3:00pm
Join us for our annual craft fair. If you are interested in a table please contact Carol at 613-283-3631. Free admission and canteen available.
Lombardy Agricultural Hall

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Art Journey’s Annual Fall Show and Sale

10:00am – 4:00pm
Come meet the artists and shop for some one of a kind creations.
Door prizes to be drawn at the end of show on Sunday.
Live entertainment by Vine Rhymes both days 10 am- 4 pm.
Artists Demos throughout both days- see website for schedule.
Smiths Falls Memorial Community Centre
71 Cornelia St. W.
www.artjourneysmithsfalls.com

8th Annual Hymn Sing-a-long

Dessert & coffee at 6pm with the hymn sing at 7pm
Bethel United in Rideau Ferry.
With the Bethel United Church choir and special guests the Rideau Mellowdears all male chorus.

Men’s Sheds in Lanark County: A space for community and camaraderie

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 @ 10:09 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Jane Hobson
jane@pdgmedia.ca

The Table Community Food Centre in Perth was livelier than usual last night (Sept. 20) as people gathered to eat, mingle and learn about Men’s Sheds in Lanark County.

Men’s Sheds are collaborative, communal spaces where men gather to woodwork, cook, and yell at the television during playoff season together.

There are currently two Men’s Sheds in Lanark County. Hackberry Men’s Shed in Carleton Place and Perth Men’s Shed.

“Despite the name, Men’s Sheds are usually hosted in community spaces,” said Ramsey Hart, who works at the Table. He runs the Perth Men’s Shed and often hosts it at the Table.

Doug Mackie, a Winnipeg native who attended the event, introduced Men’s Sheds to Canada. He created Woodhaven Men’s Shed in Winnipeg about seven years ago.

“Men’s Shed is a place that encourages socializing, camaraderie and mental well-being,” Mackie, 76, said.

Men’s Sheds started in Australia in 2007 and are multiplying across the globe.

The evening was funded through a grant from Movember Canada in support of men’s health.

Check out Lanark County Men’s Sheds on Facebook to get involved.

Lanark County Ontario Works not mailing payments in September

Tuesday, August 30, 2016 @ 09:08 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

Due to the uncertainty of Canada Post mail service at this time, Lanark County Ontario Works will not be issuing any payments by mail.

If you are expecting payment by cheque, you may pick it up at your Ontario Works office in Perth, Smiths Fall or Carleton Place starting Aug. 31st as follows:

Aug. 31 between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sept. 1 between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sept. 2 between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Proper identification is required at time of cheque pick. Your cheque will be sent to the town in your mailing address

If you receive your payment by direct bank deposit (DBD) you should not experience any delay in your payment.

Drug stores will honour your August 2016 drug card for September. As soon as the threat of a labour disruption is cleared, your September statements will be mailed.

If you have any questions, please contact the Ontario Works office at 613-267-4200 ext. 2140, or toll free 1-888-952-6275.

Tay Valley heritage takes first place at Lanark County plowing match

Monday, August 29, 2016 @ 10:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

Picture perfect blue skies and the green fields of the Moodie-Cameron farm set an ideal stage for Tay Valley Township’s Settlers Heritage Day and Lanark County Plowing Match on Aug. 20. The tremendously successful event brought visitors, locals and plowing match participants together for a full day of competition, information and celebration as part of the area’s 200th Anniversary signature events.

Visitors had a jam packed day taking in all the activities, exhibits and demonstrations. Larger than expected crowds stayed entertained with the music of the Bowes Brothers and live action displays of blacksmithing, sheep shearing, fence-building and even weaving on a traditional loom. Wee ones were amused with storytelling, face painting, a corral of miniature animals and even a Tay Valley trivia quest, encouraging them to interact with exhibitors.

The furthest travelling visitor was California resident Robert Holderness. Mr. Holderness made a special trip to the event as his ancestors were amongst those families that travelled on the first settler ship, The Atlas, a face he learned while researching his family history. After wintering in Brockville, these first settlers trekked to, and eventually homesteaded in, the environs in and around Tay Valley.

Genealogical displays, 200 year old land records, antiques and heritage craft exhibits helped visitors appreciate and learn what life was like for the first settlers.

The Lanark Drumming Circle was on hand to perform a sacred smudging ceremony and to drum and sing songs dedicated to all ancestors and their lands. They spoke to the sense of community and welcoming that existed between those early settlers and the original indigenous peoples, a relationship that continues today.

Registered plowing competitors mounted tractors and put their plowing skills into play, vying for points and placings to advance to the International Plowing Match, Sept. 20-24th in Harriston, Town of Minto.

Special VIP and media plowers included MPP Randy Hillier, Lanark Co. Warden Gail Code, Tay Valley Reeve Keith Kerr, former Lanark Co. Warden, Gordon Patterson, Ontario Queen of the Furrow Kathryn Chant, Lake 88’s Brian Perkins, Tay Valley Councillor Jennifer Dickson, former Lanark County Queen of the Furrow Treena Code, 200th Anniversary Working Group member and event organizer David Taylor, and one of the newest “settlers” to the area, Syrian born Ahmad Almdhe, who proudly took the red ribbon in the VIP division!

The Two Rivers Food Hub had a special presence with a “Taste of the Tay” sampling table that featured Tay Valley growers, producers and farm gate outlets. It demonstrated that the township’s strong agricultural roots continue to thrive on modern day farms. Over 50 of these family farms received Legacy Farm Certificates, a joint 200th Anniversary initiative that honoured family farms that held 100, 150 or 200 years of same family ownership. Recipients proudly received their certificates in a ceremony conducted by Tay Valley councillor and chair of the 200th anniversary working group, Jennifer Dickson, and Tay Valley Reeve Keith Kerr.

The event showcased the best of Tay Valley’s proud history, community values, agricultural roots and welcoming atmosphere.

 

Lanark County Tourism kicks off new marketing project with funding from OHTO

Tuesday, August 23, 2016 @ 08:08 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted

The Lanark County Tourism Association (LCTA) has received funding from Ontario’s Highlands Tourism Organization (OHTO), as part of OHTO’s Tourism Development Partnership Program (TDPP), which will allow the association to kick off it’s new marketing campaign while supporting the Come Wander brand.

“The TDPP program is designed to encourage and support collaborative tourism development initiatives that reflect the Come Wander regional brand platform, that align with strategic objectives, and that can demonstrate long term benefits to the region,’” said Stephanie Hessel, tourism development and industry relations coordinator for. “We are excited to support this LCTA initiative and looking forward to seeing its potential to support the Come Wander brand.”

Over the next several months, LCTA will be gathering content for the creation of an image database, coordinating the production of two 30-second tourism videos highlighting tourism assets in Lanark County, as well as the creation of copywriting content. The image and video database will be accessible by tourism operators and stakeholders in Lanark County, at no cost.

“Our goal is to assist our membership to promote themselves and their business as a tourism destination in Lanark County,” LCTA President, Bob Mingie, said. “Having the tools available to market your business, and the region, is a good way for LCTA to support our businesses.”

LCTA will be reaching out to community members and organizations for contributions of photographs to be included in the image database, as well as contracting with a local photographer for more targeted shots. A videographer will be working in the area over a two-day period in August.

The second phase of the project will involve the marketing component of the content, and distribution through online and digital media. This phase of the project is expected to begin in 2017.

In June 2016, LCTA received funding to support the project from Lanark County, in the amount of $3,500, which LCTA is matching for an additional $3,500, bringing total available funds for the project up to $7,000.

OHTO will provide matching funding for LCTA’s tourism projects in the amount of 50 per cent of project costs.

Lanark County Tourism Association (LCTA) is a membership based tourism organization committed to supporting tourism operators in Lanark County, and providing a collective voice for stakeholder.

 

Celebrate Lanark County’s bounty at harvest festival

Sunday, August 14, 2016 @ 10:08 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted

Want to get fresh with a local farmer? The fourth annual Lanark County Harvest Festival will give everyone a chance to do just that.

This outdoor event, slated for Sunday, Sept. 11 at Beckwith Park (1319, 9th Line, Beckwith), will celebrate the county’s bounty of the harvest featuring local producers, food seminars, cooking demonstrations, children’s activities, local musicians, historical displays and more. This year, we celebrate the 200th anniversary by showcasing the people, products and projects of Beckwith, Drummond/North Elmsley, Perth and Tay Valley.

The Lanark County Harvest Festival is an opportunity for people to meet our local farmers and purchase local food and other locally made products. The county has a unique blend of producers, passions and food.

The festival will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is a collaboration of several local groups, including Lanark Local Flavour, Lanark County Farmers’ Markets, the Lanark County Museums Network, the Lanark County Agricultural Advisory Working Group, the Township of Beckwith, and Lanark County.

In 2016, the collaboration among four Beckwith Churches will continue to deliver the popular “Harvest Church Supper” of traditional stew including lamb stew, vegetable stew, beef stew and gluten-free stew (not to mention pie of all kinds). Some of the participants are growing the ingredients, and others are sourcing local ingredients. It is “stew good to miss.” Tickets are $12 and will be sold in advance (online at Ticketsplease.ca) or at the door for the supper, taking place from 4:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the main arena building following the Harvest Festival. The program includes cooking demonstrations featuring local chefs who will present information about cooking with local ingredients. The renowned “Bowes Brothers” are returning as the musical entertainment; and children’s activities (weather permitting) such as a petting zoo, bouncy castle, and face painting, can be expected.

“The event provides a perfect opportunity for local producers to connect with visitors and residents,” adds Marie White, Lanark County tourism manager. “The benefits of local food are becoming ever more popular. This festival is a good time to celebrate by sharing food, stories and laughter.”

“Beckwith Township is pleased to be the host municipality for the Lanark County Harvest Festival,” says Richard Kidd, Beckwith Reeve. “Our staff has been working very hard with partners to ensure the event is a huge success. It is a tribute to our agricultural past and future.”

This annual event supports more than 55 local businesses and six farmers’ markets, as well as developing a new business network for the county’s producers. “We hope to continue to create employment, build on the customer base and encourage lots of visitors to come to Lanark County,” states festival founder Bill Dobson, Montague Reeve.

“Along with the 200th celebration, Lanark County will be celebrating its 150 years” adds Gail Code, Lanark County Warden. “We invite you to join us on centre stage for the cake cutting ceremony at noon.

Lanark County OPP keeping eye on new smartphone game

Thursday, August 11, 2016 @ 01:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Sam Cooley
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

You could say it’s been a good month for the Pokemon Go players chasing Pikachu through Lanark County.

No accidents, robberies or collisions have occurred as a result of the video game, according to OPP Constable David Bird. “Hopefully our community stays that way,” he said.

Pokemon Go is a smart-phone game where users chase down and capture digital critters in a semi-virtual reality which utilizes a phone’s GPS and camera systems. Released on July 16 in Canada, it has on occasion been the source of distraction for some of its users.

According to Bird, the game appears to have gained a bit of traction among the local population in towns throughout Lanark, where groups of players have been spotted gaming in public parks.

While he said the game might be getting some folks off the couch and into the outdoors, which is a good thing, Bird echoed a potential public safety concern shared by other police agencies across the country.

Amid reports of players jaywalking, running into traffic, crashing skateboards and trespassing, nobody in Lanark County has been issued a citation as a result of distractedly playing the game. At least not yet.

“I think anything like that would be dealt with (by) officers informally,” Bird said, indicating it has not been an issue.

“Everything we do comes back to public safety. You have to have care when you have anything fun. You can’t afford to let that screen be your view of reality.”

Under provincial legislation, if a Pokemon player is gaming while driving he or she could potentially face a $1,000 fine and three demerit points for distracted driving. But that isn’t stopping everyone.

Recently, two female drivers narrowly avoided colliding with one another while simultaneously playing Pokemon Go behind the wheel in an Innisfil, Ont. parking lot in late July, according to the Canadian Press.

And according to American media, unscrupulous users of the application have also reportedly lured Pokemon Go players into shadowy alleys before robbing unsuspecting gamers.

Pokemon Go seems to be showing no signs of slowing down in its popularity. In less than a month it has taken the world by storm with more than 75 million downloads and its creators are already planning a number of expansions to keep players interested.

At around the same time of the game’s release, Toronto City Council attempted to ban texting while walking on Toronto roadways. The province quashed the potential ban request but indicated a future ban could be instated if a bylaw was ever passed in that city.

Health unit raises awareness about bats and rabies

Thursday, August 11, 2016 @ 12:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted

Bats are beneficial to the ecosystem, but they can carry diseases such as rabies and histoplasmosis, which can affect humans and animals. They may also transmit distemper and mange to household pets. Bats are nocturnal animals and feed most actively two or three hours following sunset. They are efficient insect controllers eating about three times their body weight. Bats typically have their babies in June and come August many of the young bats are looking for their own roosting sites. Many bats will roost and hibernate in attics.

Approximately three percent of bats carry the rabies virus. The most common signs of rabies in bats are the inability to fly and resting in unusual places such as the ground or floor. It is important to remember many of the bats that get into our homes are healthy bats and are looking for a way out.

Bat encounters
If you find a bat in your home and are absolutely sure that there was no human or animal contact, try to confine the bat to one room by closing the door of the room. Open a window or door to the outside and then turn out the lights; the bat should fly out early in the evening. Be sure to wear gloves and other protective clothing at all times when dealing with a bat.

If you are bitten by a bat or if saliva from a bat gets into your eyes, nose, mouth or a wound, wash the affected area thoroughly and get medical attention immediately. Should you find a bat in your home and are unsure if it has bitten a family member, contact your Health Care Provider and the Health Unit to determine if treatment is required. Prior to calling check for fresh bites and scratches that may be a result of contact with the bat.

Bat proofing your home
Bat proofing your house is necessary when bats are entering the living space of your home. It is advisable to contact a pest management company or a wildlife conservation agency for assistance with bat-proofing your home.

Rabies can also affect pets; to protect your pet from rabies it is important to vaccinate them. Rabies vaccination is mandatory in Ontario for domestic cats and dogs. The Health Unit in Partnership with local Veterinarians and Municipalities will be holding the annual Rabies Clinics in September, please visit our website for more information.

Smiths Falls Waste and Recycling Guide

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Posts Tagged ‘Lanark County’

Drug to reverse opioid overdose now more accessible to community

Thursday, November 10, 2016 @ 01:11 PM
posted by Tara McNeil

Opioid misuse and overdoses are a growing concern across Canada and the U.S. In Ontario alone, opioids cause one death every 13 hours — and Lanark County is not immune. Twenty-four people in Lanark County have died of opioid misuse since 2010.

As part of a larger harm reduction strategy, on June 24 the province expanded access of naloxone, the drug used to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, to pharmacies.

Kits, which contain at least two doses of the drug, needles for injection, arm snappers, gloves, a rescue breathing barrier and a client ID card, can be obtained by eligible recipients free of charge from participating pharmacies. As of Oct. 7, health units were also given the same access.

Eligible recipients include opioid users; anyone with a history of use; and family members, friends or other people in a position to assist a person at risk of overdose from opioids. Kits are given without a prescription.

The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit has been distributing naloxone kits since December 2014, but until the Oct. 7 decision, only to members of the community that have a history of opioid use. “We’ve distributed 158 kits. We’ve had 15 kits been used and used successfully,” says Jennifer Adams, registered nurse and harm reduction coordinator at the Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit.

Now that friends and family members are able to obtain kits as well from the health unit, it gives more meaning and purpose to the program. “The group that is going to need it is the friends and family,” Adams says.

Because the life-saving drug is injectable, training is given at the same time the kit is distributed. Adams says this could hinder the pharmacy program as sometimes the training takes about 10 minutes, or it can take upwards of an hour — it all depends on the client. At the health unit, clients are taken into a private room, shown how to use the kit and get any questions they might have answered. When picked up at a pharmacy, the level of privacy could be diminished and time limited.

“Harm reduction programs often carry embarrassment and shame. But we have some who don’t care, who are very open about what they do,” she says, adding that the benefit of distributing kits through pharmacies is that pharmacies are often open longer and later than health units.

“It’s a good step in the right direction. It’s coming from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. They are making it a priority,” Adams says. “This is just one step, one part of the solution.”  

Adams notes that, so far, there has been very little negative backlash from the expanded access to naloxone. “The drugs are here, and they are here to say,” she says. “We have a segment of the population that is going to use, despite the treatment out there. If we don’t provide them with the method to save themselves, there is no option for treatment. We are trying to keep them healthy while in their addiction.”

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 11 – 13

Thursday, November 10, 2016 @ 10:11 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 11 – 13

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11

Remembrance Day Ceremony

11:00am
Join us to honour all Veterans.
Smiths Falls Cenotaph

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12

40 Plus Singles Dinner/Dance

7:00pm
7pm dinner, followed by dance with Blue Thunder at 8pm. Casual dress (no jeans). Cash bar. Call Betty at 613-285-5557, or Wanda or Alice at 613-205-1234. There is music for everyone. You don’t have to be a dancer to enjoy this event; just come and enjoy the evening with people who have similar interests to yours. Cost: $10
Smiths Falls Civitan Hall
12468 Hwy 15 N., Smiths Falls
40plussinglesdanceclub@gmail.com
613-285-5557

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

THE RIDEAU MELLOWDEARS IN SMITHS FALLS

7:00pm
Free Willing Offering
Westminster Presbyterian Church
11 Church St. W., Smiths Falls

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 4 – 6

Wednesday, November 2, 2016 @ 11:11 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

Smiths Falls weekend guide: November 4 – 6

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 4

Victim Services Lanark County Drop In

8:30am – 4:00pm
Victim Services Lanark County is a community-based program that provides immediate, confidential short-term crisis intervention services, practical assistance, information, referrals and emotional support to persons affected by crime, tragedy and disaster. Everyone is welcome. Drop in and speak to one of our staff! All services are free, voluntary and confidential.
Carambeck Community Centre
351 Bridge Street, Carleton Place
For more information visit www.victimserviceslanark.ca

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5

Annual Craft Sale

Join us for our annual craft sale at the Smiths Falls Civitan.
Smiths Falls Civitan
Mary Lou Linton: 613.283.7172
Jeannette Crawford: 613.293.5405

Candy Cane Bazaar & Luncheon

11:00am – 2:00pm
Great Christmas gifts for everyone! Crafts, baking, accessories, jewellery, balloon burst & more.
Free Admission
Luncheon:$6
Trinity United Church Smiths Falls
41 Market St. N.

Dance with the Doherty Brothers

8:00pm – 12:00am (midnight)
Come out for an evening of fun & dance in support of the community pool.
Tickets at Special Greetings, 8 Russell St. E. or The Aquatic Recreation Centre, 361 Queen St.
Gallipeau Centre
361 Queen St.

Art Journey’s Annual Fall Show and Sale

10:00am – 4:00pm
Come meet the artists and shop for some one of a kind creations.
Door prizes to be drawn at the end of show on Sunday.
Live entertainment by Vine Rhymes both days 10 am- 4 pm.
Artists Demos throughout both days- see website for schedule.
Smiths Falls Memorial Community Centre
71 Cornelia St. W.
www.artjourneysmithsfalls.com

35th Annual Art Show & Sale

10:30am – 4:30pm
35th Annual Art Show & Sale, with Christmas Artisan Market – Original works by over 30 local artists. Whether your personal taste leans towards landscapes, still life studies, impressionism or sculpture, you will be surprised and pleased by the wide variety of works available. Come find the perfect Christmas gift for family, friends or yourself!
Heritage House Museum
Carol Miller: 613.283.6311
heritagehouse@smithsfalls.ca
www.facebook.com/HeritageHouseMuseum
www.smithsfalls.ca/heritagehouse

Giant Falls Craft Fair

10:00am – 3:00pm
Join us for our annual craft fair. If you are interested in a table please contact Carol at 613-283-3631. Free admission and canteen available.
Lombardy Agricultural Hall

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Art Journey’s Annual Fall Show and Sale

10:00am – 4:00pm
Come meet the artists and shop for some one of a kind creations.
Door prizes to be drawn at the end of show on Sunday.
Live entertainment by Vine Rhymes both days 10 am- 4 pm.
Artists Demos throughout both days- see website for schedule.
Smiths Falls Memorial Community Centre
71 Cornelia St. W.
www.artjourneysmithsfalls.com

8th Annual Hymn Sing-a-long

Dessert & coffee at 6pm with the hymn sing at 7pm
Bethel United in Rideau Ferry.
With the Bethel United Church choir and special guests the Rideau Mellowdears all male chorus.

Men’s Sheds in Lanark County: A space for community and camaraderie

Wednesday, September 21, 2016 @ 10:09 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Jane Hobson
jane@pdgmedia.ca

The Table Community Food Centre in Perth was livelier than usual last night (Sept. 20) as people gathered to eat, mingle and learn about Men’s Sheds in Lanark County.

Men’s Sheds are collaborative, communal spaces where men gather to woodwork, cook, and yell at the television during playoff season together.

There are currently two Men’s Sheds in Lanark County. Hackberry Men’s Shed in Carleton Place and Perth Men’s Shed.

“Despite the name, Men’s Sheds are usually hosted in community spaces,” said Ramsey Hart, who works at the Table. He runs the Perth Men’s Shed and often hosts it at the Table.

Doug Mackie, a Winnipeg native who attended the event, introduced Men’s Sheds to Canada. He created Woodhaven Men’s Shed in Winnipeg about seven years ago.

“Men’s Shed is a place that encourages socializing, camaraderie and mental well-being,” Mackie, 76, said.

Men’s Sheds started in Australia in 2007 and are multiplying across the globe.

The evening was funded through a grant from Movember Canada in support of men’s health.

Check out Lanark County Men’s Sheds on Facebook to get involved.

Lanark County Ontario Works not mailing payments in September

Tuesday, August 30, 2016 @ 09:08 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

Due to the uncertainty of Canada Post mail service at this time, Lanark County Ontario Works will not be issuing any payments by mail.

If you are expecting payment by cheque, you may pick it up at your Ontario Works office in Perth, Smiths Fall or Carleton Place starting Aug. 31st as follows:

Aug. 31 between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sept. 1 between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Sept. 2 between 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Proper identification is required at time of cheque pick. Your cheque will be sent to the town in your mailing address

If you receive your payment by direct bank deposit (DBD) you should not experience any delay in your payment.

Drug stores will honour your August 2016 drug card for September. As soon as the threat of a labour disruption is cleared, your September statements will be mailed.

If you have any questions, please contact the Ontario Works office at 613-267-4200 ext. 2140, or toll free 1-888-952-6275.

Tay Valley heritage takes first place at Lanark County plowing match

Monday, August 29, 2016 @ 10:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

Picture perfect blue skies and the green fields of the Moodie-Cameron farm set an ideal stage for Tay Valley Township’s Settlers Heritage Day and Lanark County Plowing Match on Aug. 20. The tremendously successful event brought visitors, locals and plowing match participants together for a full day of competition, information and celebration as part of the area’s 200th Anniversary signature events.

Visitors had a jam packed day taking in all the activities, exhibits and demonstrations. Larger than expected crowds stayed entertained with the music of the Bowes Brothers and live action displays of blacksmithing, sheep shearing, fence-building and even weaving on a traditional loom. Wee ones were amused with storytelling, face painting, a corral of miniature animals and even a Tay Valley trivia quest, encouraging them to interact with exhibitors.

The furthest travelling visitor was California resident Robert Holderness. Mr. Holderness made a special trip to the event as his ancestors were amongst those families that travelled on the first settler ship, The Atlas, a face he learned while researching his family history. After wintering in Brockville, these first settlers trekked to, and eventually homesteaded in, the environs in and around Tay Valley.

Genealogical displays, 200 year old land records, antiques and heritage craft exhibits helped visitors appreciate and learn what life was like for the first settlers.

The Lanark Drumming Circle was on hand to perform a sacred smudging ceremony and to drum and sing songs dedicated to all ancestors and their lands. They spoke to the sense of community and welcoming that existed between those early settlers and the original indigenous peoples, a relationship that continues today.

Registered plowing competitors mounted tractors and put their plowing skills into play, vying for points and placings to advance to the International Plowing Match, Sept. 20-24th in Harriston, Town of Minto.

Special VIP and media plowers included MPP Randy Hillier, Lanark Co. Warden Gail Code, Tay Valley Reeve Keith Kerr, former Lanark Co. Warden, Gordon Patterson, Ontario Queen of the Furrow Kathryn Chant, Lake 88’s Brian Perkins, Tay Valley Councillor Jennifer Dickson, former Lanark County Queen of the Furrow Treena Code, 200th Anniversary Working Group member and event organizer David Taylor, and one of the newest “settlers” to the area, Syrian born Ahmad Almdhe, who proudly took the red ribbon in the VIP division!

The Two Rivers Food Hub had a special presence with a “Taste of the Tay” sampling table that featured Tay Valley growers, producers and farm gate outlets. It demonstrated that the township’s strong agricultural roots continue to thrive on modern day farms. Over 50 of these family farms received Legacy Farm Certificates, a joint 200th Anniversary initiative that honoured family farms that held 100, 150 or 200 years of same family ownership. Recipients proudly received their certificates in a ceremony conducted by Tay Valley councillor and chair of the 200th anniversary working group, Jennifer Dickson, and Tay Valley Reeve Keith Kerr.

The event showcased the best of Tay Valley’s proud history, community values, agricultural roots and welcoming atmosphere.

 

Lanark County Tourism kicks off new marketing project with funding from OHTO

Tuesday, August 23, 2016 @ 08:08 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted

The Lanark County Tourism Association (LCTA) has received funding from Ontario’s Highlands Tourism Organization (OHTO), as part of OHTO’s Tourism Development Partnership Program (TDPP), which will allow the association to kick off it’s new marketing campaign while supporting the Come Wander brand.

“The TDPP program is designed to encourage and support collaborative tourism development initiatives that reflect the Come Wander regional brand platform, that align with strategic objectives, and that can demonstrate long term benefits to the region,’” said Stephanie Hessel, tourism development and industry relations coordinator for. “We are excited to support this LCTA initiative and looking forward to seeing its potential to support the Come Wander brand.”

Over the next several months, LCTA will be gathering content for the creation of an image database, coordinating the production of two 30-second tourism videos highlighting tourism assets in Lanark County, as well as the creation of copywriting content. The image and video database will be accessible by tourism operators and stakeholders in Lanark County, at no cost.

“Our goal is to assist our membership to promote themselves and their business as a tourism destination in Lanark County,” LCTA President, Bob Mingie, said. “Having the tools available to market your business, and the region, is a good way for LCTA to support our businesses.”

LCTA will be reaching out to community members and organizations for contributions of photographs to be included in the image database, as well as contracting with a local photographer for more targeted shots. A videographer will be working in the area over a two-day period in August.

The second phase of the project will involve the marketing component of the content, and distribution through online and digital media. This phase of the project is expected to begin in 2017.

In June 2016, LCTA received funding to support the project from Lanark County, in the amount of $3,500, which LCTA is matching for an additional $3,500, bringing total available funds for the project up to $7,000.

OHTO will provide matching funding for LCTA’s tourism projects in the amount of 50 per cent of project costs.

Lanark County Tourism Association (LCTA) is a membership based tourism organization committed to supporting tourism operators in Lanark County, and providing a collective voice for stakeholder.

 

Celebrate Lanark County’s bounty at harvest festival

Sunday, August 14, 2016 @ 10:08 AM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted

Want to get fresh with a local farmer? The fourth annual Lanark County Harvest Festival will give everyone a chance to do just that.

This outdoor event, slated for Sunday, Sept. 11 at Beckwith Park (1319, 9th Line, Beckwith), will celebrate the county’s bounty of the harvest featuring local producers, food seminars, cooking demonstrations, children’s activities, local musicians, historical displays and more. This year, we celebrate the 200th anniversary by showcasing the people, products and projects of Beckwith, Drummond/North Elmsley, Perth and Tay Valley.

The Lanark County Harvest Festival is an opportunity for people to meet our local farmers and purchase local food and other locally made products. The county has a unique blend of producers, passions and food.

The festival will run from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is a collaboration of several local groups, including Lanark Local Flavour, Lanark County Farmers’ Markets, the Lanark County Museums Network, the Lanark County Agricultural Advisory Working Group, the Township of Beckwith, and Lanark County.

In 2016, the collaboration among four Beckwith Churches will continue to deliver the popular “Harvest Church Supper” of traditional stew including lamb stew, vegetable stew, beef stew and gluten-free stew (not to mention pie of all kinds). Some of the participants are growing the ingredients, and others are sourcing local ingredients. It is “stew good to miss.” Tickets are $12 and will be sold in advance (online at Ticketsplease.ca) or at the door for the supper, taking place from 4:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. in the main arena building following the Harvest Festival. The program includes cooking demonstrations featuring local chefs who will present information about cooking with local ingredients. The renowned “Bowes Brothers” are returning as the musical entertainment; and children’s activities (weather permitting) such as a petting zoo, bouncy castle, and face painting, can be expected.

“The event provides a perfect opportunity for local producers to connect with visitors and residents,” adds Marie White, Lanark County tourism manager. “The benefits of local food are becoming ever more popular. This festival is a good time to celebrate by sharing food, stories and laughter.”

“Beckwith Township is pleased to be the host municipality for the Lanark County Harvest Festival,” says Richard Kidd, Beckwith Reeve. “Our staff has been working very hard with partners to ensure the event is a huge success. It is a tribute to our agricultural past and future.”

This annual event supports more than 55 local businesses and six farmers’ markets, as well as developing a new business network for the county’s producers. “We hope to continue to create employment, build on the customer base and encourage lots of visitors to come to Lanark County,” states festival founder Bill Dobson, Montague Reeve.

“Along with the 200th celebration, Lanark County will be celebrating its 150 years” adds Gail Code, Lanark County Warden. “We invite you to join us on centre stage for the cake cutting ceremony at noon.

Lanark County OPP keeping eye on new smartphone game

Thursday, August 11, 2016 @ 01:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Sam Cooley
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

You could say it’s been a good month for the Pokemon Go players chasing Pikachu through Lanark County.

No accidents, robberies or collisions have occurred as a result of the video game, according to OPP Constable David Bird. “Hopefully our community stays that way,” he said.

Pokemon Go is a smart-phone game where users chase down and capture digital critters in a semi-virtual reality which utilizes a phone’s GPS and camera systems. Released on July 16 in Canada, it has on occasion been the source of distraction for some of its users.

According to Bird, the game appears to have gained a bit of traction among the local population in towns throughout Lanark, where groups of players have been spotted gaming in public parks.

While he said the game might be getting some folks off the couch and into the outdoors, which is a good thing, Bird echoed a potential public safety concern shared by other police agencies across the country.

Amid reports of players jaywalking, running into traffic, crashing skateboards and trespassing, nobody in Lanark County has been issued a citation as a result of distractedly playing the game. At least not yet.

“I think anything like that would be dealt with (by) officers informally,” Bird said, indicating it has not been an issue.

“Everything we do comes back to public safety. You have to have care when you have anything fun. You can’t afford to let that screen be your view of reality.”

Under provincial legislation, if a Pokemon player is gaming while driving he or she could potentially face a $1,000 fine and three demerit points for distracted driving. But that isn’t stopping everyone.

Recently, two female drivers narrowly avoided colliding with one another while simultaneously playing Pokemon Go behind the wheel in an Innisfil, Ont. parking lot in late July, according to the Canadian Press.

And according to American media, unscrupulous users of the application have also reportedly lured Pokemon Go players into shadowy alleys before robbing unsuspecting gamers.

Pokemon Go seems to be showing no signs of slowing down in its popularity. In less than a month it has taken the world by storm with more than 75 million downloads and its creators are already planning a number of expansions to keep players interested.

At around the same time of the game’s release, Toronto City Council attempted to ban texting while walking on Toronto roadways. The province quashed the potential ban request but indicated a future ban could be instated if a bylaw was ever passed in that city.

Health unit raises awareness about bats and rabies

Thursday, August 11, 2016 @ 12:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

Submitted

Bats are beneficial to the ecosystem, but they can carry diseases such as rabies and histoplasmosis, which can affect humans and animals. They may also transmit distemper and mange to household pets. Bats are nocturnal animals and feed most actively two or three hours following sunset. They are efficient insect controllers eating about three times their body weight. Bats typically have their babies in June and come August many of the young bats are looking for their own roosting sites. Many bats will roost and hibernate in attics.

Approximately three percent of bats carry the rabies virus. The most common signs of rabies in bats are the inability to fly and resting in unusual places such as the ground or floor. It is important to remember many of the bats that get into our homes are healthy bats and are looking for a way out.

Bat encounters
If you find a bat in your home and are absolutely sure that there was no human or animal contact, try to confine the bat to one room by closing the door of the room. Open a window or door to the outside and then turn out the lights; the bat should fly out early in the evening. Be sure to wear gloves and other protective clothing at all times when dealing with a bat.

If you are bitten by a bat or if saliva from a bat gets into your eyes, nose, mouth or a wound, wash the affected area thoroughly and get medical attention immediately. Should you find a bat in your home and are unsure if it has bitten a family member, contact your Health Care Provider and the Health Unit to determine if treatment is required. Prior to calling check for fresh bites and scratches that may be a result of contact with the bat.

Bat proofing your home
Bat proofing your house is necessary when bats are entering the living space of your home. It is advisable to contact a pest management company or a wildlife conservation agency for assistance with bat-proofing your home.

Rabies can also affect pets; to protect your pet from rabies it is important to vaccinate them. Rabies vaccination is mandatory in Ontario for domestic cats and dogs. The Health Unit in Partnership with local Veterinarians and Municipalities will be holding the annual Rabies Clinics in September, please visit our website for more information.

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