keep it local

Posts Tagged ‘food’

Carleton Place Christmas Basket seeks local support

Thursday, November 17, 2016 @ 11:11 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

By Jane Hobson
jane@pdgmedia.ca

Christmas is a great time to reconnect with family and friends to share anecdotes from the previous year and well wishes for the upcoming over a hot meal. Unfortunately, the reality of the holiday season is not this bright and breezy for some in Carleton Place.

Carleton Place Christmas Basket puts food on the table and presents under the tree for families in need.

Carleton Place Christmas Basket is asking for local support to make the program a success once again as the holiday season approaches. The program relies on local donations to supply a complete Christmas breakfast and supper to families and individuals in need during the holidays.

“We distributed 297 baskets last year,” said Wayne Drummond, the Carleton Place Christmas Basket program coordinator. “All the baskets stay within the K7C postal area,” he said. Drummond says donations have traditionally come from both individuals and commercial enterprises in the community. No donations come from government programs.

“Not everyone can afford the traditional family festivities during the Christmas season,” Drummond said. “It’s really important that we connect as a community so that Christmas is a happy time for all.”

Each basket contains a pancake breakfast, complete with pancakes, syrup, bread, butter, peanut butter, jam and milk. The turkey dinner includes apple juice, potatoes, carrots, turkey, dressing, cranberries, gravy and a dessert.

About 1,000 people, a third of whom are younger than 16, also received presents from the Angel Tree Program that is affiliated with Carleton Place Christmas Basket. Angel Tree Program gifts are combined with the appropriate basket.

“I think [the baskets] really do help,” said Dr. Sean Murphy from Murphy Chiropractic’s in Carleton Place. Murphy Chiropractic’s has been a drop-off destination for donated winter hats, mittens and scarves for the last 13 years. The winter items are packed into the Christmas baskets. The office usually starts accepting donations at the end of October.

“Sometimes the Christmas Basket gets a last minute call on Christmas Eve so it’s really important that we start early to make sure we have enough for everyone in need,” Murphy said. “I think it’s a success because giving makes you feel good, it’s healthy for everyone involved.” Murphy said. “People are more willing to give at this time of year.”

“Ray always donates a lot which is very helpful,” said Drummond, talking about Ray MacLaren, the manager of the Carleton Place Giant Tiger.

Donated hats, mittens and scarves must be new. Handmade is accepted.

For more information about Christmas Baskets, contact Wayne Drummond at wdrumm9@gmail.com.

Photo by Jane Hobson
Dr. Sean Murphy (bottom left) poses for a photo with Wayne Drummond (middle) and Ray MacLaren (top right) with other chiropractic employees in front of a box of donated winter clothing on Oct. 24, 2016. Murphy Chiropractic in Carleton Place has been helping Carleton Place Christmas Basket collect winter items for 13 years.

Perth Weekend Guide: June 3-5

Thursday, June 2, 2016 @ 10:06 PM
posted by admin

FRIDAY

9 to 5: The Musical
8 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth
For more information visit studiotheatreperth.com

Perth Fire Fighters’ Association Golf Tournament
12:45 p.m. start
Perth Golf Course

SATURDAY

Perth Farmers’ Market
8 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Tay Basin Parking Lot

9 to 5: The Musical
8 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth
For more information visit studiotheatreperth.com

Hungry Planet Pop-Ups
11:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Hungry Planet

Perth 200th Anniversary Walking Food Tour
1 p.m.
Downtown Perth
Call the Matheson House Museum to arrange tickets – 613-267-1947.

Perth Museum Bird Watching Tour
8:15 a.. – 11 a.m.
Perth Wildlife Reserve
Cost is $20 per person and includes parking. Tickets are available in advance at the Perth Museum and Visitor Information Centre (11 Gore St. East, Perth – 613-267-1947).

SUNDAY

 9 to 5: The Musical
2 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth
For more information visit studiotheatreperth.com

Downton Abbey Style High Tea and Luncheon
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Crystal Palace
For information please call the Tea Room, participants are encouraged to come in costume.

 

Monday night food summits come to Food Hub

Tuesday, August 4, 2015 @ 09:08 PM
posted by admin

BY: MADDIE LANGE-CHENIER

The Two Rivers Food Hub at the Gallipeau Centre is hoping to teach about topics small scale food producers and processors would need to know with its Monday night food summits. The Hub held its first one June 27.

The first summit focused sweet preserving, with a live demonstration. Food Hub general manager Bruce Enloe says the summits are the start of an important dialogue about local food production.

“We’re calling them Monday night summits because they’re not exactly a workshop, not exactly a seminar, sort of an open house so it’s just a chance for people who have an interest in a shared topic . . . to all come in and meet and have a dialogue.”

The summit also welcomes members of the community to the events for free.

“It is open to the public but we’re hoping since it’s specifically about sweet preserves that it will be people that have an interest in that, and not people that are just coming to see what’s going on at the food hub,” Enloe says.

Organizers say the first summit was a success. It showed participants the safety and technical side of sweet preserving, such as how to ensure jars are properly sealed.

The summits will take place every month, on the last Monday of the month. August’s summit will feature the more savory side of preserving, like pickling.

“We have a couple of others in progress. We [called July’s] ‘Sweet Success’ and the next one will be sour – we’re going to do pickling. It will still be canning-based information sessions, but this month [was] geared toward the sweet side of things and next month will be geared towards the savory side,” says Enloe.

“We’re successful in advance because it’s going to be fun, no matter what,” says Enloe. Anyone interested is asked to pre-register on the Two Rivers Food Hub website.

The summits tie in with the food hub’s mission to connect food buyers to the food sellers. They support local farms throughout the Lanark, Leeds, and Grenville counties, getting their name from the two rivers that run through these counties. The Two Rivers Food Hub started out small but through grants and donations is now a non-profit company that is intended to be self-sustaining in three to five years. The Two Rivers Food Hub has many goals they hope to accomplish including access to commercial kitchen rentals, starting a wholesale aggregation and distribution service, beginning a weekly food box program, buying processing and storage equipment, and offering informal agricultural extension services.

Is chocolate a health food?

Sunday, February 1, 2015 @ 11:02 AM
posted by admin

By Vickie Dickson

Chocolate is a Health Food.

Do I have your attention?

While researching for this article, I came across this set of instructions for eating chocolate:

When tasting chocolate, let it sit in your mouth to release the primary flavours and aromas. Then, chew it a few times to release the secondary aromas. Let it rest against the roof of your mouth to get the full flavour.

Can you taste it? I can! Time to hit the local Health Food Store for some dark, rich, “therapeutic” chocolate.

To be clear, the chocolate that I’m speaking of is dark- the darker, the better. While it may not have the smooth, creamy texture that makes milk chocolate so popular, it lacks the high sugar content. Also, unlike milk chocolate, dark chocolate has not been stripped of its beneficial nutrients. It is an acquired taste, but within a short period of time, your palette will adapt and be completely satisfied with a small serving of dark chocolate. I promise.

There are many health benefits that come from eating dark chocolate, some of which are listed below.

  • It is rich in antioxidants and natural compounds that are good for cardiovascular health. The darker the chocolate, the higher the antioxidants (milk chocolate has few, if any, antioxidants).
  • Bacteria in the gut will break down and ferment components in the dark chocolate, turning them into absorbable, anti-inflammatory compounds.
  • Like aspirin, dark chocolate has a biochemical effect that reduces the excessive accumulation of platelets, which can cause harmful blood clots.
  • The flavonoids in dark chocolate may help the brain after a stroke by increasing cellular signals that shield nerve cells from damage
  • Raw, dark chocolate prevents oxidative damage to blood vessel linings, which effectively relaxes blood vessels and lowers blood pressure.
  • The fat (cocoa butter) found in raw, dark chocolate is a healthy fat and as such, helps to slow the absorption of sugar into the blood stream.

Clearly, we are not talking about your mass produced candy bars here. Please leave the Kit-Kats, the Mars Bars and the Oh Henry’s on the shelf.   The chocolate that boasts the most health benefits is the kind that is closest to the natural, raw state of the cocoa bean. The closer to the raw state, the higher the health benefits (like most foods)!

When purchasing raw, dark chocolate, you will find it on the shelf of your local Health Food Store. To receive the greatest health benefits, look for chocolate that is:

  • fair trade
  • organic
  • non GMO
  • high cocoa content
  • low sugar content
  • not artificially sweetened

As with all things, moderation is key.  Two squares of raw, dark chocolate is a serving, not the whole bar!

Happy Valentines Day!

Smiths Falls Waste and Recycling Guide

Read HERE: Smiths Falls Waste Guide ... Read More









Posts Tagged ‘food’

Carleton Place Christmas Basket seeks local support

Thursday, November 17, 2016 @ 11:11 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

By Jane Hobson
jane@pdgmedia.ca

Christmas is a great time to reconnect with family and friends to share anecdotes from the previous year and well wishes for the upcoming over a hot meal. Unfortunately, the reality of the holiday season is not this bright and breezy for some in Carleton Place.

Carleton Place Christmas Basket puts food on the table and presents under the tree for families in need.

Carleton Place Christmas Basket is asking for local support to make the program a success once again as the holiday season approaches. The program relies on local donations to supply a complete Christmas breakfast and supper to families and individuals in need during the holidays.

“We distributed 297 baskets last year,” said Wayne Drummond, the Carleton Place Christmas Basket program coordinator. “All the baskets stay within the K7C postal area,” he said. Drummond says donations have traditionally come from both individuals and commercial enterprises in the community. No donations come from government programs.

“Not everyone can afford the traditional family festivities during the Christmas season,” Drummond said. “It’s really important that we connect as a community so that Christmas is a happy time for all.”

Each basket contains a pancake breakfast, complete with pancakes, syrup, bread, butter, peanut butter, jam and milk. The turkey dinner includes apple juice, potatoes, carrots, turkey, dressing, cranberries, gravy and a dessert.

About 1,000 people, a third of whom are younger than 16, also received presents from the Angel Tree Program that is affiliated with Carleton Place Christmas Basket. Angel Tree Program gifts are combined with the appropriate basket.

“I think [the baskets] really do help,” said Dr. Sean Murphy from Murphy Chiropractic’s in Carleton Place. Murphy Chiropractic’s has been a drop-off destination for donated winter hats, mittens and scarves for the last 13 years. The winter items are packed into the Christmas baskets. The office usually starts accepting donations at the end of October.

“Sometimes the Christmas Basket gets a last minute call on Christmas Eve so it’s really important that we start early to make sure we have enough for everyone in need,” Murphy said. “I think it’s a success because giving makes you feel good, it’s healthy for everyone involved.” Murphy said. “People are more willing to give at this time of year.”

“Ray always donates a lot which is very helpful,” said Drummond, talking about Ray MacLaren, the manager of the Carleton Place Giant Tiger.

Donated hats, mittens and scarves must be new. Handmade is accepted.

For more information about Christmas Baskets, contact Wayne Drummond at wdrumm9@gmail.com.

Photo by Jane Hobson
Dr. Sean Murphy (bottom left) poses for a photo with Wayne Drummond (middle) and Ray MacLaren (top right) with other chiropractic employees in front of a box of donated winter clothing on Oct. 24, 2016. Murphy Chiropractic in Carleton Place has been helping Carleton Place Christmas Basket collect winter items for 13 years.

Perth Weekend Guide: June 3-5

Thursday, June 2, 2016 @ 10:06 PM
posted by admin

FRIDAY

9 to 5: The Musical
8 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth
For more information visit studiotheatreperth.com

Perth Fire Fighters’ Association Golf Tournament
12:45 p.m. start
Perth Golf Course

SATURDAY

Perth Farmers’ Market
8 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Tay Basin Parking Lot

9 to 5: The Musical
8 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth
For more information visit studiotheatreperth.com

Hungry Planet Pop-Ups
11:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Hungry Planet

Perth 200th Anniversary Walking Food Tour
1 p.m.
Downtown Perth
Call the Matheson House Museum to arrange tickets – 613-267-1947.

Perth Museum Bird Watching Tour
8:15 a.. – 11 a.m.
Perth Wildlife Reserve
Cost is $20 per person and includes parking. Tickets are available in advance at the Perth Museum and Visitor Information Centre (11 Gore St. East, Perth – 613-267-1947).

SUNDAY

 9 to 5: The Musical
2 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth
For more information visit studiotheatreperth.com

Downton Abbey Style High Tea and Luncheon
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Crystal Palace
For information please call the Tea Room, participants are encouraged to come in costume.

 

Monday night food summits come to Food Hub

Tuesday, August 4, 2015 @ 09:08 PM
posted by admin

BY: MADDIE LANGE-CHENIER

The Two Rivers Food Hub at the Gallipeau Centre is hoping to teach about topics small scale food producers and processors would need to know with its Monday night food summits. The Hub held its first one June 27.

The first summit focused sweet preserving, with a live demonstration. Food Hub general manager Bruce Enloe says the summits are the start of an important dialogue about local food production.

“We’re calling them Monday night summits because they’re not exactly a workshop, not exactly a seminar, sort of an open house so it’s just a chance for people who have an interest in a shared topic . . . to all come in and meet and have a dialogue.”

The summit also welcomes members of the community to the events for free.

“It is open to the public but we’re hoping since it’s specifically about sweet preserves that it will be people that have an interest in that, and not people that are just coming to see what’s going on at the food hub,” Enloe says.

Organizers say the first summit was a success. It showed participants the safety and technical side of sweet preserving, such as how to ensure jars are properly sealed.

The summits will take place every month, on the last Monday of the month. August’s summit will feature the more savory side of preserving, like pickling.

“We have a couple of others in progress. We [called July’s] ‘Sweet Success’ and the next one will be sour – we’re going to do pickling. It will still be canning-based information sessions, but this month [was] geared toward the sweet side of things and next month will be geared towards the savory side,” says Enloe.

“We’re successful in advance because it’s going to be fun, no matter what,” says Enloe. Anyone interested is asked to pre-register on the Two Rivers Food Hub website.

The summits tie in with the food hub’s mission to connect food buyers to the food sellers. They support local farms throughout the Lanark, Leeds, and Grenville counties, getting their name from the two rivers that run through these counties. The Two Rivers Food Hub started out small but through grants and donations is now a non-profit company that is intended to be self-sustaining in three to five years. The Two Rivers Food Hub has many goals they hope to accomplish including access to commercial kitchen rentals, starting a wholesale aggregation and distribution service, beginning a weekly food box program, buying processing and storage equipment, and offering informal agricultural extension services.

Is chocolate a health food?

Sunday, February 1, 2015 @ 11:02 AM
posted by admin

By Vickie Dickson

Chocolate is a Health Food.

Do I have your attention?

While researching for this article, I came across this set of instructions for eating chocolate:

When tasting chocolate, let it sit in your mouth to release the primary flavours and aromas. Then, chew it a few times to release the secondary aromas. Let it rest against the roof of your mouth to get the full flavour.

Can you taste it? I can! Time to hit the local Health Food Store for some dark, rich, “therapeutic” chocolate.

To be clear, the chocolate that I’m speaking of is dark- the darker, the better. While it may not have the smooth, creamy texture that makes milk chocolate so popular, it lacks the high sugar content. Also, unlike milk chocolate, dark chocolate has not been stripped of its beneficial nutrients. It is an acquired taste, but within a short period of time, your palette will adapt and be completely satisfied with a small serving of dark chocolate. I promise.

There are many health benefits that come from eating dark chocolate, some of which are listed below.

  • It is rich in antioxidants and natural compounds that are good for cardiovascular health. The darker the chocolate, the higher the antioxidants (milk chocolate has few, if any, antioxidants).
  • Bacteria in the gut will break down and ferment components in the dark chocolate, turning them into absorbable, anti-inflammatory compounds.
  • Like aspirin, dark chocolate has a biochemical effect that reduces the excessive accumulation of platelets, which can cause harmful blood clots.
  • The flavonoids in dark chocolate may help the brain after a stroke by increasing cellular signals that shield nerve cells from damage
  • Raw, dark chocolate prevents oxidative damage to blood vessel linings, which effectively relaxes blood vessels and lowers blood pressure.
  • The fat (cocoa butter) found in raw, dark chocolate is a healthy fat and as such, helps to slow the absorption of sugar into the blood stream.

Clearly, we are not talking about your mass produced candy bars here. Please leave the Kit-Kats, the Mars Bars and the Oh Henry’s on the shelf.   The chocolate that boasts the most health benefits is the kind that is closest to the natural, raw state of the cocoa bean. The closer to the raw state, the higher the health benefits (like most foods)!

When purchasing raw, dark chocolate, you will find it on the shelf of your local Health Food Store. To receive the greatest health benefits, look for chocolate that is:

  • fair trade
  • organic
  • non GMO
  • high cocoa content
  • low sugar content
  • not artificially sweetened

As with all things, moderation is key.  Two squares of raw, dark chocolate is a serving, not the whole bar!

Happy Valentines Day!

Connect With Us


Comments/Feedback
“Our Strength lies in our differences, not in our similarities” ― Stephen R. Covey
"Come experience our world-class destination on the banks of the Rideau Canal"