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Posts Tagged ‘fire department’

Plan to restructure fire command gets green light from council

Monday, November 14, 2016 @ 08:11 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Chris Must
chris@pdgmedia.ca

Smiths Falls councillors have been assured that a plan to replace a retiring fire captain with three lieutenants won’t result in any significant increase in fire protection costs.

At a regular meeting of town council Monday, Nov. 7, Fire Chief Normand Beauchamp explained that Capt. Richard Laming has retired. Instead of appointing a new captain, Beauchamp said he intends to put three lieutenants in supervisory roles. One lieutenant will be responsible for fire prevention, another for logistics (vehicles, equipment and scheduling), and another for training and health and safety. The position of captain will be eliminated.

Councillors asked for more time to ask questions and think about the plan before amending a town bylaw to allow the restructuring to take place. At a meeting of council’s Committee of the Whole Monday, Nov. 14, which the fire chief was unable to attending, Chief Administrative Officer Malcolm Morris said having three lieutenants in addition to the chief would bring the fire department in line with government standards for “span of control” calling for one officer for every seven firefighters. In response to questions, he also stated that the lieutenants must be full-time firefighters rather than volunteers, to ensure they are available at all times.

“It’s management’s right to structure the department as they see fit,” said Morris. “It just requires a bylaw to enshrine this.”

Morris said the restructuring is cost neutral because “We’re not replacing the captain position,” which is higher paid.

The bylaw amendment will be voted on at the next regular council meeting.

Chief plans restructuring of Smiths Falls fire department

Monday, November 7, 2016 @ 09:11 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Chris Must
chris@pdgmedia.ca 

The retirement of a senior officer is prompting plans to alter the command structure of the Smiths Falls Fire Department.

At a regular meeting of town council on Monday, Nov. 7, Fire Chief Normand Beauchamp explained that Capt. Richard Laming has retired. Instead of appointing a new captain, Beauchamp said he intends to put three lieutenants in supervisory roles. One lieutenant will be responsible for fire prevention, another for logistics (vehicles, equipment and scheduling), and another for training and health and safety. The position of captain will be eliminated.

The new structure will be similar to the way the fire department was organized from 1994 to 2003, said Beauchamp. Having a lieutenant responsible for fire safety will allow the department to invest more effort in this area, he said, adding that, “Our main mandate is to provide fire safety in town.”

Because the position of captain was well paid, said Beauchamp, the new structure should cost roughly the same in salaries, said Beauchamp. The existing arrangement, with only two senior officers, “does not comply with the laws and standards of the industry,” he stated in a written report.

Councillor Chris Cummings, noting that council was seeing this report for the first time at the Nov. 7 meeting, stated that he was not prepared to approve a motion to allow the restructuring without taking the time to think it over.

Chief Administrative Officer Malcolm Morris said the timing of the report was due to the captain’s retirement taking place “much sooner than anticipated,” and added that the matter will be brought back to council for formal approval as quickly as possible.

Almonte & Mississippi Mills weekend guide: October 7 – 10

Friday, October 7, 2016 @ 06:10 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

Almonte & Mississippi Mills Weekend Guide: October 7 – 10

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


SATURDAY,OCTOBER 8

Fire Department Open House

10:00am – 2:00pm
Fire Prevention Week come out and meet Sparky the fire dog and meet the firefighters. There will be a fire truck display, Sparky’s craft table, fire safety activities, junior firefighter obstacle course, fire hose target and a barbecue lunch. Free admission.
Mississippi Mills Fire Department, Fire Station #1
478 Almonte St, Almonte
millstonenews.com/2016/09/fire-department-open-house-october-8.html

Crown and Pumpkin

10:00am – 5:00pm
Over 45 artists/artisans at 19 stops. Their array of artists has grown with the addition of a paper relief artist, new glass artists, fibre artists, and printmakers, on top of the already impressive line-up of painters, jewellers, photographers, heritage farmers, potters, and décor upcyclers, as well as a pewterer, soapmaker, weaver, animal portraitist, milliner, book illustrator, maker of natural skin products, and Korean paper crafter.
Fluid coffee, Hummingbird chocolate, SweetCheeks gluten-free/vegan baking and maple syrup are also on the tour.
For more information contact Barbara Mullally: 613-256-3647
Crownandpumkin.com

Meet the Artist:Penny Rugs

2:00pm – 4:00pm
Penny rugs emerged in the mid-nineteenth century when thrifty homemakers used wool scraps from old clothing to create decorative table toppers, seat covers and rugs. The wool was boiled in water and, when dry, the felted wool was cut using coins as templates — hence the name. These were then stitched onto a cloth backing and embellished with embroidery. A penny would often be sewn in for luck.
Come and discover these wonderful pieces of folk art in Danielle Potvin’s exhibition “A Penny Rug”, which runs from October 4 to December 10 at the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum.
Mississippi Valley Textile Museum
3 Rosamond St. E, Almonte
info@mvtm.ca
mvtm.ca
613-256-3754

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9

Crown and Pumpkin

10:00am – 5:00pm
Over 45 artists/artisans at 19 stops. Their array of artists has grown with the addition of a paper relief artist, new glass artists, fibre artists, and printmakers, on top of the already impressive line-up of painters, jewellers, photographers, heritage farmers, potters, and décor upcyclers, as well as a pewterer, soapmaker, weaver, animal portraitist, milliner, book illustrator, maker of natural skin products, and Korean paper crafter.
Fluid coffee, Hummingbird chocolate, SweetCheeks gluten-free/vegan baking and maple syrup are also on the tour.
For more information contact Barbara Mullally: 613-256-3647
Crownandpumkin.com

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10

Crown and Pumpkin

10:00am – 5:00pm
Over 45 artists/artisans at 19 stops. Their array of artists has grown with the addition of a paper relief artist, new glass artists, fibre artists, and printmakers, on top of the already impressive line-up of painters, jewellers, photographers, heritage farmers, potters, and décor upcyclers, as well as a pewterer, soapmaker, weaver, animal portraitist, milliner, book illustrator, maker of natural skin products, and Korean paper crafter.
Fluid coffee, Hummingbird chocolate, SweetCheeks gluten-free/vegan baking and maple syrup are also on the tour.
For more information contact Barbara Mullally: 613-256-3647
Crownandpumkin.com

Smiths Falls Fire Department to get new air compressor

Tuesday, September 6, 2016 @ 09:09 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Howida Sorour-Roberts
heddy@pdgmedia.ca

Following a brief discussion and question period during a Special Committee of the Whole, held immediately before the regular council meeting, Smiths Falls council passed a motion to purchase a breathing air compressor for the Smiths Falls Fire Department.

“Bear in mind that we fill, on average, more than 600 cylinders a year,” said Normand Beauchamp, Smiths Falls fire chief.

The old compressor is no longer working and at a conservative estimate is more than 30 years old, according to Beauchamp.

Two requests for quotes were solicited but only one supplier responded.  The cost of the new compressor is $47,264.

The fire department had already budgeted $45,000 and on Sept. 6 received approval from council for an out of budget expenditure of $2,300 to purchase the new compressor.

“We can’t upgrade the one we have, which runs at 2,800 psi, while the industry standard is 4,500 psi.  Currently we have to go somewhere else to get our tanks filled,” Beauchamp told Hometown News.

The cost of having the fire department’s oxygen tanks filled at a filling station would run to $15,000 a year according to the fire chief. A new compressor will allow the fire department to maintain breathing air cylinders filled with air on demand and will also allow them to fill up other fire department’s air cylinders as well as those for the occasional scuba diver.  The potential revenue from these activities is about $600 a year.

What to do when flashing lights appear in your rear-view mirror

Monday, August 29, 2016 @ 12:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Chris Must
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

There’s nothing like a set of flashing blue and red lights suddenly appearing in the rear-view mirror to get a motorist’s attention. Every driver knows to pull over and come to a stop, and it’s always a relief when the speeding police car continues on its way: it wasn’t you this time.

In Ontario police vehicles responding to an emergency will display red and blue flashing lights. An ambulance is equipped with red lights. But blue and red are not the only colours used by emergency vehicles. The Highway Traffic Act of 1990 authorizes firefighters to display a flashing green light when responding to emergencies. The act restricts the use of flashing green lights in Ontario to firefighters only. Tow trucks are equipped with amber lights.

But regardless of the type of emergency vehicle a driver encounters on the road – police, fire or ambulance – the requirement, as explained in the Ontario Ministry of Transportation Drivers’ Handbook, is the same. “When an emergency vehicle is approaching your vehicle from any direction with its flashing red or red and blue lights, or siren or bell sounding, you are required to bring your vehicle to an immediate stop.”

The handbook goes on to explain that when bringing your vehicle to a stop you are required to bring it as close as practical to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway, not onto the shoulder of the roadway. This is because emergency vehicles may be using the shoulder of the road to make their way around traffic.

If you are in an intersection and preparing to make a turn when an emergency vehicle is approaching, you should abandon the turn and clear the intersection by proceeding straight when safe to do so, then pull to the right and stop. This will clear the intersection and minimize the possibility of a collision with the emergency vehicle should it be passing you on the side you intended to turn towards.

The handbook also notes that it is illegal in Ontario to follow within 150 metres of a fire vehicle responding to an alarm.

Safety tips
1. React quickly but calmly.

  1. Don’t slam on the brakes or pull over without signalling.
  2. Check your rearview mirrors to make sure it’s safe to stop. Also make sure the way is clear, and signal, before merging back into traffic.

The penalty for failure to slow down or move over when safe to do so near emergency vehicles or two trucks that are stopped with sirens or lights flashing is a fine of $400 to $2,000 for a first conviction, and three demerit points upon conviction, according to the Ministry of Transportation. Fines increase for subsequent offences.

Smiths Falls Waste and Recycling Guide

Read HERE: Smiths Falls Waste Guide ... Read More









Posts Tagged ‘fire department’

Plan to restructure fire command gets green light from council

Monday, November 14, 2016 @ 08:11 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Chris Must
chris@pdgmedia.ca

Smiths Falls councillors have been assured that a plan to replace a retiring fire captain with three lieutenants won’t result in any significant increase in fire protection costs.

At a regular meeting of town council Monday, Nov. 7, Fire Chief Normand Beauchamp explained that Capt. Richard Laming has retired. Instead of appointing a new captain, Beauchamp said he intends to put three lieutenants in supervisory roles. One lieutenant will be responsible for fire prevention, another for logistics (vehicles, equipment and scheduling), and another for training and health and safety. The position of captain will be eliminated.

Councillors asked for more time to ask questions and think about the plan before amending a town bylaw to allow the restructuring to take place. At a meeting of council’s Committee of the Whole Monday, Nov. 14, which the fire chief was unable to attending, Chief Administrative Officer Malcolm Morris said having three lieutenants in addition to the chief would bring the fire department in line with government standards for “span of control” calling for one officer for every seven firefighters. In response to questions, he also stated that the lieutenants must be full-time firefighters rather than volunteers, to ensure they are available at all times.

“It’s management’s right to structure the department as they see fit,” said Morris. “It just requires a bylaw to enshrine this.”

Morris said the restructuring is cost neutral because “We’re not replacing the captain position,” which is higher paid.

The bylaw amendment will be voted on at the next regular council meeting.

Chief plans restructuring of Smiths Falls fire department

Monday, November 7, 2016 @ 09:11 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Chris Must
chris@pdgmedia.ca 

The retirement of a senior officer is prompting plans to alter the command structure of the Smiths Falls Fire Department.

At a regular meeting of town council on Monday, Nov. 7, Fire Chief Normand Beauchamp explained that Capt. Richard Laming has retired. Instead of appointing a new captain, Beauchamp said he intends to put three lieutenants in supervisory roles. One lieutenant will be responsible for fire prevention, another for logistics (vehicles, equipment and scheduling), and another for training and health and safety. The position of captain will be eliminated.

The new structure will be similar to the way the fire department was organized from 1994 to 2003, said Beauchamp. Having a lieutenant responsible for fire safety will allow the department to invest more effort in this area, he said, adding that, “Our main mandate is to provide fire safety in town.”

Because the position of captain was well paid, said Beauchamp, the new structure should cost roughly the same in salaries, said Beauchamp. The existing arrangement, with only two senior officers, “does not comply with the laws and standards of the industry,” he stated in a written report.

Councillor Chris Cummings, noting that council was seeing this report for the first time at the Nov. 7 meeting, stated that he was not prepared to approve a motion to allow the restructuring without taking the time to think it over.

Chief Administrative Officer Malcolm Morris said the timing of the report was due to the captain’s retirement taking place “much sooner than anticipated,” and added that the matter will be brought back to council for formal approval as quickly as possible.

Almonte & Mississippi Mills weekend guide: October 7 – 10

Friday, October 7, 2016 @ 06:10 AM
posted by Tara McNeil

Almonte & Mississippi Mills Weekend Guide: October 7 – 10

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


SATURDAY,OCTOBER 8

Fire Department Open House

10:00am – 2:00pm
Fire Prevention Week come out and meet Sparky the fire dog and meet the firefighters. There will be a fire truck display, Sparky’s craft table, fire safety activities, junior firefighter obstacle course, fire hose target and a barbecue lunch. Free admission.
Mississippi Mills Fire Department, Fire Station #1
478 Almonte St, Almonte
millstonenews.com/2016/09/fire-department-open-house-october-8.html

Crown and Pumpkin

10:00am – 5:00pm
Over 45 artists/artisans at 19 stops. Their array of artists has grown with the addition of a paper relief artist, new glass artists, fibre artists, and printmakers, on top of the already impressive line-up of painters, jewellers, photographers, heritage farmers, potters, and décor upcyclers, as well as a pewterer, soapmaker, weaver, animal portraitist, milliner, book illustrator, maker of natural skin products, and Korean paper crafter.
Fluid coffee, Hummingbird chocolate, SweetCheeks gluten-free/vegan baking and maple syrup are also on the tour.
For more information contact Barbara Mullally: 613-256-3647
Crownandpumkin.com

Meet the Artist:Penny Rugs

2:00pm – 4:00pm
Penny rugs emerged in the mid-nineteenth century when thrifty homemakers used wool scraps from old clothing to create decorative table toppers, seat covers and rugs. The wool was boiled in water and, when dry, the felted wool was cut using coins as templates — hence the name. These were then stitched onto a cloth backing and embellished with embroidery. A penny would often be sewn in for luck.
Come and discover these wonderful pieces of folk art in Danielle Potvin’s exhibition “A Penny Rug”, which runs from October 4 to December 10 at the Mississippi Valley Textile Museum.
Mississippi Valley Textile Museum
3 Rosamond St. E, Almonte
info@mvtm.ca
mvtm.ca
613-256-3754

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9

Crown and Pumpkin

10:00am – 5:00pm
Over 45 artists/artisans at 19 stops. Their array of artists has grown with the addition of a paper relief artist, new glass artists, fibre artists, and printmakers, on top of the already impressive line-up of painters, jewellers, photographers, heritage farmers, potters, and décor upcyclers, as well as a pewterer, soapmaker, weaver, animal portraitist, milliner, book illustrator, maker of natural skin products, and Korean paper crafter.
Fluid coffee, Hummingbird chocolate, SweetCheeks gluten-free/vegan baking and maple syrup are also on the tour.
For more information contact Barbara Mullally: 613-256-3647
Crownandpumkin.com

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10

Crown and Pumpkin

10:00am – 5:00pm
Over 45 artists/artisans at 19 stops. Their array of artists has grown with the addition of a paper relief artist, new glass artists, fibre artists, and printmakers, on top of the already impressive line-up of painters, jewellers, photographers, heritage farmers, potters, and décor upcyclers, as well as a pewterer, soapmaker, weaver, animal portraitist, milliner, book illustrator, maker of natural skin products, and Korean paper crafter.
Fluid coffee, Hummingbird chocolate, SweetCheeks gluten-free/vegan baking and maple syrup are also on the tour.
For more information contact Barbara Mullally: 613-256-3647
Crownandpumkin.com

Smiths Falls Fire Department to get new air compressor

Tuesday, September 6, 2016 @ 09:09 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Howida Sorour-Roberts
heddy@pdgmedia.ca

Following a brief discussion and question period during a Special Committee of the Whole, held immediately before the regular council meeting, Smiths Falls council passed a motion to purchase a breathing air compressor for the Smiths Falls Fire Department.

“Bear in mind that we fill, on average, more than 600 cylinders a year,” said Normand Beauchamp, Smiths Falls fire chief.

The old compressor is no longer working and at a conservative estimate is more than 30 years old, according to Beauchamp.

Two requests for quotes were solicited but only one supplier responded.  The cost of the new compressor is $47,264.

The fire department had already budgeted $45,000 and on Sept. 6 received approval from council for an out of budget expenditure of $2,300 to purchase the new compressor.

“We can’t upgrade the one we have, which runs at 2,800 psi, while the industry standard is 4,500 psi.  Currently we have to go somewhere else to get our tanks filled,” Beauchamp told Hometown News.

The cost of having the fire department’s oxygen tanks filled at a filling station would run to $15,000 a year according to the fire chief. A new compressor will allow the fire department to maintain breathing air cylinders filled with air on demand and will also allow them to fill up other fire department’s air cylinders as well as those for the occasional scuba diver.  The potential revenue from these activities is about $600 a year.

What to do when flashing lights appear in your rear-view mirror

Monday, August 29, 2016 @ 12:08 PM
posted by April Scott-Clarke

By Chris Must
editorial@pdgmedia.ca

There’s nothing like a set of flashing blue and red lights suddenly appearing in the rear-view mirror to get a motorist’s attention. Every driver knows to pull over and come to a stop, and it’s always a relief when the speeding police car continues on its way: it wasn’t you this time.

In Ontario police vehicles responding to an emergency will display red and blue flashing lights. An ambulance is equipped with red lights. But blue and red are not the only colours used by emergency vehicles. The Highway Traffic Act of 1990 authorizes firefighters to display a flashing green light when responding to emergencies. The act restricts the use of flashing green lights in Ontario to firefighters only. Tow trucks are equipped with amber lights.

But regardless of the type of emergency vehicle a driver encounters on the road – police, fire or ambulance – the requirement, as explained in the Ontario Ministry of Transportation Drivers’ Handbook, is the same. “When an emergency vehicle is approaching your vehicle from any direction with its flashing red or red and blue lights, or siren or bell sounding, you are required to bring your vehicle to an immediate stop.”

The handbook goes on to explain that when bringing your vehicle to a stop you are required to bring it as close as practical to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway, not onto the shoulder of the roadway. This is because emergency vehicles may be using the shoulder of the road to make their way around traffic.

If you are in an intersection and preparing to make a turn when an emergency vehicle is approaching, you should abandon the turn and clear the intersection by proceeding straight when safe to do so, then pull to the right and stop. This will clear the intersection and minimize the possibility of a collision with the emergency vehicle should it be passing you on the side you intended to turn towards.

The handbook also notes that it is illegal in Ontario to follow within 150 metres of a fire vehicle responding to an alarm.

Safety tips
1. React quickly but calmly.

  1. Don’t slam on the brakes or pull over without signalling.
  2. Check your rearview mirrors to make sure it’s safe to stop. Also make sure the way is clear, and signal, before merging back into traffic.

The penalty for failure to slow down or move over when safe to do so near emergency vehicles or two trucks that are stopped with sirens or lights flashing is a fine of $400 to $2,000 for a first conviction, and three demerit points upon conviction, according to the Ministry of Transportation. Fines increase for subsequent offences.

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