keep it local

Snowshoe running – the new frontier in winter cross-training

Snow1

BY AMY HOGUE

Dedicated runners are often challenged by the winter road conditions that come along with a Canadian climate, where snow, slush and ice are constant hazards for anyone in a pair of running shoes. For those training for triathlons, duathlons or competitive racing, winter can make a serious dent in a training schedule. This could be why running guru, Corey Turnbull, has looked to a new and challenging sport to add into his cross training schedule in the winter months – snowshoe running.

Snowshoe running is an activity that must be experienced firsthand to truly appreciate it. Essentially, runners race in specialized lightweight snow shoes on trails, most often through naturally wooded areas. What that description doesn’t tell you is the experience that accompanies the activity, including the silence in the forest and the winter scenery you travel through, which is spectacular.

Turnbull said he was encouraged to try snowshoe running four years ago after talking to ‘ultra marathon runner’ Derrick Spafford. “We were just chatting back and forth about different things…he sells Dion snowshoes and had a pair to lend me,” Turnbull said, adding that for him part of the special appeal of the sport is the winter scenery on the running trails used for snowshoe running. “I fell in love with it instantly. It’s like trail running, which is great, but it’s just simply stunning. It’s such a different picture than what you see in the summertime.”

Snowshoe running also allows you to get a more intense workout in a shorter time frame. According to Turnbull, running a kilometre on snowshoes will give you a similar workout to running twice that distance on a flat surface.

It is also well suited to strength training and cross training through the winter and is more friendly for your body. Because of the intensity of the sport, Turnbull said training is typically less than 10 kilometres in a single run, which gives you a better workout in less time.

“For you to go out in the summertime and do a drop dead interval, the impact of running on the road is huge, whereas in a snow shoe you get the same benefit without impact on your body,” Turnbull explained, “The difference is you are able to get off the road, get off the slush. And the physical benefit is incredible because you get so much strength and power out of this and cardio, but you don’t have the impact.”

Turnbull’s local snowshoe running team, the Snow Squalls, train on the track at the high school when there isn’t any snow, and then at Mill Pond Conservation Area, near Lombardy, where there are several trails to choose from. Turnbull said he is still scouting out different locations to use for training. The Snow Squalls currently have about 12 members, but there are another 20 people on the fringe that train with the team but aren’t committed to competing.

Turnbull has plans to try and get a race going out at the Mill Pond or in and around the Smiths Falls area in the new year. “It’s something I’d like to do in January, have a demonstration day maybe at Lower Reach Park, people could try it, have a little fun run, or people that are racing on the team could do a little play race,” Turnbull said.

Although competition is something Turnbull enjoys, he stressed snowshoe running is not all about the competition, it’s about the activity itself. “It depends what you’re chasing, if you want to go in and get some fitness, maybe substitute one of your runs a week with this, you can…if you’re more on the competitive edge you may want to do this a couple of times a week and as an add on to your regular training schedule, that’s good, too. Whatever level you want to race at, either recreational or competitive, you’re going to find it.”

Although there are a number of competitions coming up this winter, Turnbull said he is looking at the world championships in Quebec in February, and at the possibility of entering the competition with a national team. This wouldn’t be Turnbull’s first kick at the can on a national team, he was on Team Canada’s Duathlon team a few years ago, but he said this would be a totally different experience.

Turnbull stressed that even if you are competing in races, the atmosphere between competitors is far more relaxed than at your typical road race, and the participants far friendlier. At the end of the race, participants often chat and catch up with friends while enjoying a bowl of hot chili.

“A few of us are kind of eyeing it up,” Turnbull admitted, “I’d like to go in as a national team.”

 

Leave a Reply

*

Smiths Falls Waste and Recycling Guide

Read HERE: Smiths Falls Waste Guide ... Read More








loading Loading

    • What people are saying...

    • Very happy with the creation of this page.  I find out lots that’s going on and great pictures of stuff that did! Thanks to the creators of this website!

      -Jennifer Bell – Smiths Falls Resident

    • What people are saying...

    • We are currently advertising with Discover Smiths Falls and it is an all around great experience and I recommend it!

      -Brian Paquette, Zendragon Martial Arts & Fitness

    • What people are saying...

    • We just moved to SF from Ottawa this past January and I find this website and FB page extremely helpful in helping us get to know the town better! Good job!

      -Stéphanie Farrell, Resident

    • What people are saying...

    • We have been fortunate to discover business opportunities as a result of our engagement with Discover Smiths Falls and we will most certainly be encouraging other businesses to talk to you about the services you offer.   Thank you for your support!

      -Amy Rensby, Magnolia Catering & Event Creations

    • What people are saying...

    • Great site… DSF is a one-stop Smiths Falls shop! Everything to see and do all in one online spot and it’s easy to use!! Whether you are a resident or a visitor, you will find it all on DSF! I was able to find a place to stay, a place to eat and something to do, all in a few clicks!

      -Bill Pilkington


Snowshoe running – the new frontier in winter cross-training

Snow1

BY AMY HOGUE

Dedicated runners are often challenged by the winter road conditions that come along with a Canadian climate, where snow, slush and ice are constant hazards for anyone in a pair of running shoes. For those training for triathlons, duathlons or competitive racing, winter can make a serious dent in a training schedule. This could be why running guru, Corey Turnbull, has looked to a new and challenging sport to add into his cross training schedule in the winter months – snowshoe running.

Snowshoe running is an activity that must be experienced firsthand to truly appreciate it. Essentially, runners race in specialized lightweight snow shoes on trails, most often through naturally wooded areas. What that description doesn’t tell you is the experience that accompanies the activity, including the silence in the forest and the winter scenery you travel through, which is spectacular.

Turnbull said he was encouraged to try snowshoe running four years ago after talking to ‘ultra marathon runner’ Derrick Spafford. “We were just chatting back and forth about different things…he sells Dion snowshoes and had a pair to lend me,” Turnbull said, adding that for him part of the special appeal of the sport is the winter scenery on the running trails used for snowshoe running. “I fell in love with it instantly. It’s like trail running, which is great, but it’s just simply stunning. It’s such a different picture than what you see in the summertime.”

Snowshoe running also allows you to get a more intense workout in a shorter time frame. According to Turnbull, running a kilometre on snowshoes will give you a similar workout to running twice that distance on a flat surface.

It is also well suited to strength training and cross training through the winter and is more friendly for your body. Because of the intensity of the sport, Turnbull said training is typically less than 10 kilometres in a single run, which gives you a better workout in less time.

“For you to go out in the summertime and do a drop dead interval, the impact of running on the road is huge, whereas in a snow shoe you get the same benefit without impact on your body,” Turnbull explained, “The difference is you are able to get off the road, get off the slush. And the physical benefit is incredible because you get so much strength and power out of this and cardio, but you don’t have the impact.”

Turnbull’s local snowshoe running team, the Snow Squalls, train on the track at the high school when there isn’t any snow, and then at Mill Pond Conservation Area, near Lombardy, where there are several trails to choose from. Turnbull said he is still scouting out different locations to use for training. The Snow Squalls currently have about 12 members, but there are another 20 people on the fringe that train with the team but aren’t committed to competing.

Turnbull has plans to try and get a race going out at the Mill Pond or in and around the Smiths Falls area in the new year. “It’s something I’d like to do in January, have a demonstration day maybe at Lower Reach Park, people could try it, have a little fun run, or people that are racing on the team could do a little play race,” Turnbull said.

Although competition is something Turnbull enjoys, he stressed snowshoe running is not all about the competition, it’s about the activity itself. “It depends what you’re chasing, if you want to go in and get some fitness, maybe substitute one of your runs a week with this, you can…if you’re more on the competitive edge you may want to do this a couple of times a week and as an add on to your regular training schedule, that’s good, too. Whatever level you want to race at, either recreational or competitive, you’re going to find it.”

Although there are a number of competitions coming up this winter, Turnbull said he is looking at the world championships in Quebec in February, and at the possibility of entering the competition with a national team. This wouldn’t be Turnbull’s first kick at the can on a national team, he was on Team Canada’s Duathlon team a few years ago, but he said this would be a totally different experience.

Turnbull stressed that even if you are competing in races, the atmosphere between competitors is far more relaxed than at your typical road race, and the participants far friendlier. At the end of the race, participants often chat and catch up with friends while enjoying a bowl of hot chili.

“A few of us are kind of eyeing it up,” Turnbull admitted, “I’d like to go in as a national team.”

 

Leave a Reply

*

Connect With Us


Comments/Feedback
“Our Strength lies in our differences, not in our similarities” ― Stephen R. Covey
"Come experience our world-class destination on the banks of the Rideau Canal"