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Perth Councillor raises stinky subject of dog poop in downtown

By Dianne Pinder-Moss

Councillor Jim Boldt is stepping into the issue of dog poop on downtown streets.

At the Feb. 23 regular meeting of Perth Town Council, he brought up what he called a “stinky subject” of people letting their dogs defecate on town properties and not cleaning it up. In particular, he made mention of the downtown.

“I’m finding it on the main street (Gore) a lot,” he mentioned.

In a later email to the HomeTown News, Boldt said he has had a number of complaints on this issue in the past couple of years.

“It is an issue that is very hard to enforce because a bylaw officer has to catch someone ignoring the bylaw while their dog is doing their business,” he noted.

According to Eric Cosens, the town’s Director of Development and Protective Services, there are currently two bylaws that could apply to those who are negligent in cleaning up after their animals. He says the primary bylaw is 3557, which is the Animal Control Bylaw and establishes a set fine. The enforcement officer can issue a ticket of $75 for people who fail to remove dog waste from public or private property.

The second bylaw that could potentially apply, states Cosens, is Littering Bylaw 2107.  It establishes a range of possible fines depending on whether the incident is a first, second or third offence with fines ranging from $20 to $250.

However, as Cosens points out, this bylaw is more than 40 years old, “such that there is no ability to issue tickets.  As such, the enforcing officer would issue a summons at the time of the offence for the alleged offender to appear in Provincial Offences Court.”

The Town’s animal control officer reports to Fire Chief Steve Fournier who has advised, Cosens says, that no ticket has been issued for a “poop and scoop” infraction in the past two years.

“This arises from enforcement procedures and practicality,” the director explained, noting that to issue a ticket, the animal control officer has to witness the offence.

“So on the practical side, it is not an activity that is going to be ‘caught very often,” Cosens continued. “When it is observed, the officer has, and regularly employs, the discretion to give the offender a chance to ‘poop and scoop’ voluntarily in lieu of receiving a ticket.  I am of the understanding that everyone caught in that situation recently has opted to clean up after their animal.”

To address the problem, which he said was becoming “disgusting,” Boldt was emphatic at the council meeting that “we have got to put some muscle of some kind into the bylaw.”

“I believe we have to increase fines and make this act publicly unacceptable just like smoking in a public place,” he stated after the meeting in his email response. “If people became more pro-active when they see people not scooping poop and made them feel bad about it, we might see an improvement in this area.”

Likewise, Boldt believes public awareness on this issue is a way “to bring it to the forefront.”

Kari Clarke, co-ordinator of the Perth BIA, says the BIA has received a few complaints about dog “deposits” downtown.

“The BIA is working with the Town of Perth to determine the best way to resolve this issue,” she stated.

Cosens is part of a team of managers looking into various aspects of the issue in conjunction with the BIA and developing a strategy, he says “to try and more pro-actively manage this issue.”

Cathy Hay of Hay Design recipient of this year’s Heritage Perth Architectural Conservation Award

Cathy Hay recipient of this year’s Heritage Perth Architectural Conservation Award

By Dianne Pinder-Moss

For Cathy Hay, it is “an absolute privilege” to operate a business in the Town of Perth.

“I am very honoured to be in this town,” the owner of Hay Design told members of Perth Town Council after being honoured for her efforts over the past year in preserving one of the town’s heritage buildings.

Hay Design is the recipient of the 2016 Heritage Perth Architectural Conservation Award in the Buildings category. Timed to coincide close to Ontario Heritage Week (Feb. 16 to 21), the award presentation took place at Tuesday night’s (Feb. 23) regular meeting of Perth Town Council.

Three nominations were reviewed by the Municipal Heritage Advisory Panel (MHAP) and Heritage Management Advisory Panel (HMAP) in the Building category with Hay Design being recommended to council for recognition.

There are two other award categories – Landscape and Education (related to heritage awareness) – but no nominations were received for either this year.

This is the third year for the award program, which was created by town council in 2013 after the establishment of the Downtown Perth Heritage Conservation District.

“We wanted to pay tribute to people that were doing ongoing maintenance and preservation of their properties,” Karen Rennie, Heritage Tourism Manager for the Town of Perth, explained in a telephone interview on Tuesday afternoon.

In the case of the newest award recipient, Hay was recognized for the heritage restoration work that was undertaken to the two-and-a-half-storey rubble stone building at 63 Gore St. East, on the southeast corner of Gore and Colborne streets, she purchased in early 2015. That included a significant repointing of the façade, painting with appropriate heritage colours and the installation of a new roof.

The building, which in its earlier years housed the Bathurst (Perth) Courier remains “a significant, mid-1800’s commercial structure,” Deputy-Mayor John Gemmell said prior to presenting the award. “In height, materials and massing, it anchors the north end of the business block in the centre of downtown Perth.”

For Hay who opened her interior design studio and furnishings and décor store at this location in April 2015, she is honoured to receive the award.

“I’m very grateful to the heritage committee, and the BIA is incredible here,” she told the HomeTown News afterwards.

The objective of the award program, according to its Statement of Purpose, is “to recognize, promote or otherwise encourage excellence in heritage conservation” in Perth.

And Rennie believes the program has been “very successful” in this regard, noting that a lot of work is being done within the Façade and Signage Improvement Funding Program of the Downtown Perth Community Improvement Plan. Through the façade improvement program, businesses and property owners who qualify are eligible to receive a matching grant, valued at one-third of their capital cost to a maximum of $5,000, for any improvements they wish to make to the exterior of their buildings.

As an indicator of the interest in the program, Coun. Judy Brown reported at Tuesday’s council meeting that, while the deadline for the first intake of the 2016 program isn’t until Friday, there had already been a lot of applications. So many in fact that, if all come to fruition, the $25,000 allocated in the budget for this purpose would be entirely spent and more would be required.

“There’s that much interest in it,” she stated.

Last year, an Architectural Conservation Award in the Buildings category was presented to Ron Corvari and Carol Nelder-Corvari for the heritage restoration work they undertook to their property at 77 Gore St. East, also known as The McMillan Building.

“It is a small way we can pay tribute to these property owners for their hard work,” Rennie said of the award program.

Hay believes it is important to maintain the town’s architectural heritage.

“The historical buildings is what makes the town such a beautiful place,” she noted. “The architecture in this town is absolutely incredible….That’s why I decided to open a new business here.”

Lights to brighten up downtown Perth until end of February

Lights to brighten up downtown Perth until end of February

By Dianne Pinder-Moss

The more than 10,000 lights installed in November will be brightening up the Downtown Business Improvement Area (BIA) in Perth for a little longer.

In response to a question from Coun. Jim Boldt at the Feb. 2 Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting of Perth Town Council, Coun. Judy Brown who represents council on the Perth BIA Board and is its current chair stated that the lights will be lit until the end of February.

Once the lights are turned off, they will still be left in the trees on a trial basis this year, she noted.

According to Kari Clarke, co-ordinator of the Perth BIA, the cost saving to leaving the lights in the trees is approximately $11,200.

In the fall, the lighting company that installed the lights will return to assess their condition and determine how many need to be replaced for the 2016 Christmas season.

“The BIA has partnered with the Town of Perth in creating a jointly funded downtown beautification fund ($10,000 per year), which will be used for future Christmas light concepts and or enhancements of our downtown streetscape,” Clarke said in an email response to the HomeTown News.

“In essence, by leaving the lights in place,” she continued, “this will allow the BIA and the Town of Perth to create a self-funding reserve for future beautification activities.”

With plans to increase the number of Christmas lights in the downtown for the holiday season this year, the BIA will be reaching out to local businesses, corporations and community groups to see if they are interested in sponsoring a tree. Meetings have been scheduled by the BIA for this week with businesses who have already expressed an interest in this regard.

“The trees are a wonderful way to showcase our downtown and create a destination for tourists to shop and dine in downtown Perth,” Clarke stated. “By sponsoring a tree, a business, corporation or community group is helping to beautify the downtown, and create an effect that all can enjoy.”

At the COW meeting, Brown mentioned that, at the end of January, she was still having people approach her to comment on “how fantastic they think the lights are.”

In thanking council for its support, she called the light project “one of the best things we (council) ever did.”

Perth Weekend Guide: Dec. 4-6

FRIDAY

Snowed Under
8 p.m.
Full Circle Theatre (26 Craig Street)
Ticket are $22 by calling 613-267-1884.

Annual Festival of Lights
6:30 p.m.
Crystal Palace in the Tay Basin
Sponsored by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. Call 613-267-3311 or email bia@perth.ca for further information.

Classic Cruisers Dinner Party
7 p.m.
Perth Civitan Hall
Tickets are $15 an can be purchased from Mike at 613-267-7784. Door prizes, raffle, 50/50 and more.

Westport Rideaus vs. Perth Blue Wings
7:30 p.m.
Perth & District Community Centre
Full schedule at perthbluewings.com

SATURDAY

Heritage Perth Christmas House Tour
10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Eight unique homes are on this year’s your, all transformed by local decorators. Tickets are available about Perth Home Furniture at 18 Gore Street East or by calling 613-264-9876. You can also visit the website at cfuw-perth-district.com

Maple Key Day Camp
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
St. Andrew’s Church
Your children can spend a day creating their own gifts for friends and family under the guidance of our experienced staff.  Fee includes pizza lunch, snacks, and all materials. For more information, email director@maplekeydaycamp.com

Free Public Swimming
1 p.m – 3 p.m.
Perth & District Indoor Pool
For further information please call the pool office at 613-267-5302.

Nick of Time Christmas Artisan Show
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
McMartin House (125 Gore Street East)
Admission is free. More information is available by calling 613-283-0775. Cash donations for Perth’s Food Bank will be collected at the show.

Santa Claus Parade of Lights
5 p.m.
Takes Wilson, Foster, then Gore. Finishes at the Queen Elizabeth School.
For information please email sherisells@hotmail.com.

Snowed Under
8 p.m.
Full Circle Theatre (26 Craig Street)
Ticket are $22 by calling 613-267-1884.

SUNDAY

Snowed Under
2 p.m.
Full Circle Theatre (26 Craig Street)
Ticket are $22 by calling 613-267-1884.

Tay Valley Community Choir Christmas Concert
3:30 p.m.
For more information please contact the Tay Valley Township office at 613-267-5353, ext. 110.

Free Christmas Dinner for Seniors
Perth Civitan Hall (Highway 43)
Make reservations by calling  Carol or Don at 613-264-8230, Cathie at 613-284-6263, or Hans at 613-267-3955. Choose from lunch or dinner serving, RSVP’s must be made by Dec. 5.

Brockville Tikis vs. Perth Blue Wings
3 p.m.
Perth & District Community Centre
Full schedule at perthbluewings.com

Free Public Skating
3 p.m.
Perth & District Community Centre
For more information please call the arena at 613-267-2455.

 

Heritage Perth Christmas House Tour
10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Eight unique homes are on this year’s your, all transformed by local decorators. Tickets are available about Perth Home Furniture at 18 Gore Street East or by calling 613-264-9876. You can also visit the website at cfuw-perth-district.com

 

Perth Weekend Guide: Nov. 27-29

FRIDAY

Perth & District Community Foundation Christmas Gala
6 p.m.
Music by St. Jimmy’s 4. Live and silent auctions. Formal attire. Tickets are $110 at ticketsplease.ca or Jo’s Clothes.

Ottawa West Golden Knights vs. The Perth Blue Wings
7:30 p.m.
Perth & District Community Centre
Full schedule at perthbluewings.com

Snowed Under
8 p.m.
Full Circle Theatre (26 Craig Street)
Tickets are $22 by calling 613-267-1884.

Dinner With Friends
8 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth (63 Gore Street East)
Tickets are $24 at Book Nook and Tickets Please.

Riq Turner at The Golden Arrow Pub
9 p.m.
Golden Arrow Pub (71 Foster Street)

River City Junction Live
9 p.m.
O’Reilly’s Pub (43 Gore Street)

SATURDAY

Yuletide Fair
10 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
25 Gore Street West
Lunch is $10, $5 for children 10 and under.
For more information call 613-267-2973.

Annual MERA Christmas Fair
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
MERA Schoolhouse (974 9th Concession Dalhousie)
For information please contact Marilyn at meraschoolhouse@bell.net

Midnight Makers Holiday Pop-Up Sale
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Old Shoe Factory (1 Sherbrooke Street East)
For information contact hello@midnightmakers or visit midnightmakers.com

Holiday On The Tay: Festival of Good Cheer
11 a.m.
Crystal Palace in the Tay Basin
For further information contact Kari at the BIA office: 613-267-331 or kclarke@perth.ca

Free Public Swimming
1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Perth & District Indoor Pool
For further information please call the pool office 613-267-5302.
Snowed Under
8 p.m.
Full Circle Theatre (26 Craig Street)
Tickets are $22 by calling 613-267-1884.

Dinner With Friends
8 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth (63 Gore Street East)
Tickets are $24 at Book Nook and Tickets Please.

Matt Hughes at The Golden Arrow Pub
9 p.m.
Golden Arrow Pub (71 Foster Street)

SUNDAY

Perth Farmers’ Market Hosts a Christmas Market
9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Crystal Palace in the Tay Basin

Annual Civitan Christmas Craft and Gift
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Call 613-267-5088 for more information.

Free Public Skating
12 p.m. – 1:20 p.m.
Perth & District Community Centre
For further information call the arena at 613-267-2455.

Snowed Under
2 p.m.
Full Circle Theatre (26 Craig Street)
Tickets are $22 by calling 613-267-1884.

Dinner With Friends
2 p.m.
Studio Theatre Perth (63 Gore Street East)
Tickets are $24 at Book Nook and Tickets Please.

Advent Procession with Carols
4 p.m.
St. James Anglican Church
For information call 613-267-1163 or visit stjamesperth.ca

CP Rail Holiday Train in Perth
7:40 p.m.
Wilson Street CPR Tracks
Build-A-Mountain-Of-Food campaign will be taking donations. Performers on the train include Devin Cuddy and Kelly Prescott. Wilson Street will be closed to accommodate this event. For further information call Karen at 613-267-331 ext. 2279.

 

2016 Stewart Park Festival celebrates 25 years of music

Submitted by the Stewart Park Festival 

The year 2016 marks not only the 200th anniversary of the Perth military settlement, but also the 25th anniversary of one of the area’s most popular events the Stewart Park Festival. The festival saw its humble beginnings as part of the Town of Perth’s 175th anniversary celebrations back in 1991. That year, six individuals under the auspices of the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA, oversaw a variety of activities in Stewart Park, including musical performances by Colleen Peterson, Power Snooze, The Sox and Steve Hannah.

From that time on, come July, there has been music in the park. Now the Stewart Park Festival is looking back at its own history. Local writers John McKenty, Ralph Willsey and Steve Tennant are teaming up to put together a souvenir history book to commemorate the past 25 years.

“Stewart Park Festival has been a success primarily due to the hundreds of amazing volunteers who have stepped up over the years to share the workload,” points out Tennant, “and in the process they have taken home many memories of the great times enjoyed during each and every festival. We are hoping to share these memories with everyone.”  

Recently, the festival held a songwriting competition in recognition of the 200th anniversary of the Perth military settlement. The top entry was Tim Loten’s composition entitled “Ode to the Big Cheese,” followed by Brian Lynch’s “Perth by the Tay” and “The Fields of Perth” written by Doris Folkens & Heather Elliott. These songs, as well as other contest entries, will be featured on a commemorative CD being produced by the festival and Spirit of the West’s Hugh McMillan.

Both the book and the CD will be launched at a special Founder’s Dinner to be held on July 9 at Michael’s Table in Perth. At that time, a plaque will also be unveiled recognizing the founders of the festival. The plaque will subsequently hang in the town hall.

This year the festival will open on July 14 with a special heritage show. This Thursday night show will feature an evening of music, dance & drama, all with a historical theme. The festival then runs through until Sunday July 17.

What’s New For 2016

  • 200th Anniversary CD
  • Souvenir History Book
  • Founders’ Dinner
  • Thursday Night Show

 

What’s Back in 2016

  • Music on three stages
  • Artisan & Food Market
  • Workshops
  • Children’s Activities
  • Sat & Sun Patio
  • Sunday Brunch
  • Saturday Sidewalk Sale
  • Saturday Farmers’ Market

Cyclists and skateboarders asked to stay off sidewalks

By Dianne Pinder-Moss

Perth cyclists and skateboarders are being asked to stay off the sidewalks, particularly in the downtown core during business hours.

That was the message that Councillor Jim Graff delivered at the regular meeting of Perth Town Council on Tuesday, March 22. 

Graff encouraged cyclists and skateboarders to not use the sidewalks, in particular those on Foster and Gore streets.

Bylaws governing such infractions is currently not enforceable in terms of signage, the chair of the Perth Police Services Board  said they are trying to be proactive in responding to the issue.

“To start off, we’re just asking, on their own recognizance, if [cyclists and skateboarders] wouldn’t do that, particularly during the business hours,” he said. “During the business hours, if kids are riding down [the sidewalks] with bikes and skateboards, eventually someone is going to get hurt.”

According to Graff, the Perth BIA has received complaints from businesses on this matter.

 

Carleton Place retailers might open on statutory holidays

Jane Hobson
jane@pdgmedia.ca

Stalwart Brewing Co. submitted an application to the Town of Carleton Place in late August to permit the opening of retail businesses on statutory holidays under the Retail Business Holidays Act.

This has created concern from some businesses about how this will affect them. Right now, most retail businesses in Carleton Place must be closed on statutory holidays, as per a town bylaw.
The provincially regulated Retail Business Holiday Act allows the town to create a bylaw that permits retail businesses to be open on statutory holidays for the purpose of developing and maintaining tourism.

If the bylaw requested by Stalwart is permitted, large box stores locally would most likely be forced to open by their head offices.

“We want the option,” said Adam Newlands, one of the four founders at Stalwart Brewing Company. “The spirit of the legislation is to promote tourism and that’s what we would do by being open,” he said.

Newlands says about 240 people visit the brewery on any given weekend.

“I get that people want a day off, but Stalwart is a destination that people come to on their day off, so to be closed and not allowed to be open is a disadvantage to us,” Newlands said. “We want to be here for you — we are the atmosphere that makes for a great day off,” he laughed. “People could come downtown, try a beer, have some lunch and check out the other shops.”

The Carleton Place and District Chamber of Commerce said, “We understand that the impact of opening on a statutory holiday could be different for many of our businesses. We are currently in discussions with many of our member business owners to better understand this and as such are unable to take a firm position on the matter at this time.”

The Carleton Place BIA says Carleton Place should consider permitting the bylaw because it will increase tourism and maintain competition with surrounding communities like Perth and Smiths Falls that permit local retailers to be open on statutory holidays.

“The key is to have the option,” Cathie McOrmond said. McOrmond is the BIA project manager. “I don’t see any disadvantages,” she said.

It is undecided yet whether the bylaw would apply to the entire town or if it would designate part of the town as a tourism district, allowing only retailers within that district to open on statutory holidays.

The Retail Business Holidays Act requires that the Town of Carleton Place hold a public meeting to receive comments from the applicant and public prior to the consideration of adding the bylaw.

“We’re at the fact-gathering stage before council can make a decision,” says Duncan Rogers, the clerk for the Town of Carleton Place. “We need more input from the public before we move forward.”

A public meeting will be held on Oct. 11 in the council chambers at Town Hall. To speak, the public is asked to register with Paul Knowles before the meeting. This can be done via e-mail at pknowles@carletonplace.ca or telephone at (613) 257-6207.

 

Polar Bear Dip returns to Tay River New Year’s Day

By Terrance O’Hearn

Many of Perth’s bravest souls will be seen floating briefly inside a large hole chopped from the ice of the frigid Tay River come New Year’s morning.

Each participant must parade to the water’s edge and endure a countdown, while the crowds along the riverbank shout encouragement, catcalls, or advice. In spite of the obvious reasons not to jump, almost everyone emerges from the watery depths with a huge smile, on the occasion of the Perth Polar Bear Plunge.  

Born at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Petawawa, the event moved to Perth in 1994 with founder David Lavery, who was assisted by Stan Munro and others at the Royal Canadian Legion. Since then, more than $210,000 has been raised in support of local charities.

Lavery recalls the first Perth event in 1994: “We had the initial aim of raising awareness for our local Chapter of Crime Stoppers. I was just new into the community, and I thought that continuing the plunge in Perth would be a great thing.”  

He says finding a host in the Perth Legion proved to be a perfect fit for having the right location and support. “After our first Plunge into the Tay River, we have never looked back, and the Legion has been a great ambassador throughout all of these years, and the foundation to our traditional dip.”

The Petawawa version began in 1988, jumping off the docks at CFB Petawawa. Lavery said he has “fond memories of this crazy event, and they all started while I was serving in the Canadian Armed Forces. We were young and eager to a challenge, and it was one of those challenges in 1988 that had me make one of our early Polar Bear Plunges into the dead cold icy Ottawa River.  It was on the early morning of Jan. 1, 1988 and I have never missed a plunge since, albeit not all have been icy plunges I have to confess.”

Stan Munro, considered by many to be the unofficial Mayor of Maberly, is a long-time Legion member, and has been assisting Lavery with the Plunge since the early years, along with fellow Legion member Jeanette Buker:

“I remember around the first of December, 1993, a few of us were sitting around some tables in the Legion Lounge, and Dave (Lavery) was talking about his New Year’s Polar Bear plunges at CFB Petawawa” said Munro. “We could see the ideal spot through the windows of the Lounge – on the banks of the Tay right there at the Legion.”

He just observed and learned for the first three years in Perth, and took his first jump in 1997.

“That plunge will always stick in my memory. I had raised more than $3,000 in pledges, and even though I was sick with the flu, it would have been impossible to back out. After several hours of New Year’s celebration, my wife Maureen took me to the event. I remember listening to a speech by Mayor Lana March, and then surfacing inside the hole cut in the ice. I wondered why all those people were standing around watching me.”

Although a Polar Bear “plunge” or “dip” has become a New Year’s tradition across Canada, Perth is seen to have one of the most successful and safest true Polar Bear Plunge in Canada.  Many events are held in the province of British Columbia, and Vancouver has held an event since as early as 1920, but it can be safely said that a “dip” in the relatively balmy waters off the west coast, could not compare to a full plunge into the sub-zero Tay waters.

Great War Memorial Hospital of Perth District Foundation is the recipient for 2016, and Board Executive Director and Chair Karen Rennie is excited about the opportunity for new funding which will be directed to the Intensive Care Unit at the Perth Site.

“There are three pieces that have been identified that we need to replace,” Rennie said, “the main one being the Telemetry Unit, which can cost up to $200,000.” The telemetry unit is a place in a hospital where special machines are used to help staff closely monitor patients, and is a significant upgrade in services for the Perth Site. “Every penny counts,” she said, “It would be ideal to raise $25,000 towards this project. We hope people will join us to jump on that day. It is supporting a wonderful cause.” The Foundation will match funds raised from the Polar Bear Plunge, if necessary using monies from other fundraising such as the Black Tie Bingo.

Mayor John Gemmell, a man of many hats, began plunging at the 2015 event on behalf of Perth’s 200th Anniversary Advisory Panel. He will plunge in 2016 representing the Hospital Foundation, and could also be seen as representing the Legion as first Vice-President.

“I survived the [2015 plunge],” Gemmell said, “All money raised will be going to a great cause at our GWM Hospital Site, and I am looking forward to participating again this year. I remember thinking on my first jump that is was colder coming out that jumping in, but the community benefits, and that’s a good thing.”

585 Rideau Squadron Royal Canadian Air Cadets Awards Night

IMG_5547 (3) Awards Pins May 2015BY: Philippe Legere

Members of 585 Rideau Squadron Royal Air Cadets, Smiths Falls, assembled at the Smiths Falls Memorial Community Centre May 20 to practice for their upcoming Annual Cadet Review parade scheduled for May 31.

With all the cadets on parade the squadron also took time to recognize members with awards commemorating individual achievements over the past year.

The cadets at participated in cadet competitions and squadron activities, with successes and personal achievements, while some distinguished themselves through personal commitment and demeanour.  Those included cadet range, biathlon, effective speaking and exertion competitions. As well, activities like field training exercises, their annual mess and Christmas dinners, and poppy sales in support of The Royal Canadian Legion, kept all squadron members and support staff busy since the training year began last September.

Support from Smiths Falls and surrounding communities of Perth and Merrickville is always greatly appreciated and provide added resources to the cadet program which help to enrich the cadet experience for all squadron members and support staff.  In particular, 585 Rideau Squadron presented Rob Pyefinch with a certificate of appreciation to acknowledge the financial support provided by Walmart, who once again matched the fundraising efforts of the cadets who canvassed at the Smiths Falls Walmart this past April.

This year 585 Rideau Squadron proudly awarded first year pins to Sgt. Madisen Covell, F/Cpl. Anya Rogers, Cpl. Chris Evans as well as (LACs Cameron Dumouchel, Ryan Frank, Christopher Gibson, Alex Hart, Riley Johnston, Corbett Marsh and Aidan Scharf. Two year attendance pins were awarded to F/Cpl Idreese Merhi and Cpls William McNeely and Donald Weatherall, while F/Sgt Justin Fowler was recognized for 4 years of continuous attendance.  Finally, Warrant Officers 2nd Class (WO2s) Reggie Hammond and Luke Goralczyk were acknowledged for their steadfast dedication to cadets, since first joining together in the fall of 2009, with respective six year attendance pins.

The squadron ceremony continued with the award of a bronze medallion to WO2 Reggie Hammond in recognition of his third-place finish at the Air Cadet Eastern Ontario Regional Effective Speaking Competition, held at Canadian Forces Base Kingston, this past February. Next, junior and senior squadron members were rewarded for their individual accomplishments in the fields of leadership and marksmanship, each receiving a personalized award plaque. The Junior Leadership Award was accorded to F/Cpl. Nora Bright, while WO2 Reggie Hammond received the Senior Leadership Award.  For highest proficiency with the Daisy Air Rifle, F/Cpl. Preston York was presented the Junior Marksmanship Award and WO2 Reggie Hammond the Senior Marksmanship Award. Lastly, F/Cpl Nora Bright was recognized for her exceptional attention to detail in maintaining the highest squadron standard for Dress and Deportment, while Cpl. Marc Legere was presented the 585 Rideau Squadron Spirit Award for his outstanding esprit de corps.

Additional individual 585 Rideau Squadron awards will be presented on parade at the Annual Cadet Review May 3.  The parade this year will feature a contingent of the Royal Canadian Air Force Pipes & Drums and Brigadier General Robert Mazzolin as Reviewing Officer, and is open to the public.  Those attending are asked to be seated by 12:40 p.m. in the stands at the Smiths Falls Memorial Community Centre and are invited to visit the various squadron displays and speak with the cadets and staff immediately following the parade.

Major Philippe Legere is a military volunteer with the cadets.

"Come experience our world-class destination on the banks of the Rideau Canal"