keep it local

Smiths Falls Waste and Recycling Guide

Read HERE: Smiths Falls Waste Guide ... Read More








loading Loading

    • What people are saying...

    • Very happy with the creation of this page.  I find out lots that’s going on and great pictures of stuff that did! Thanks to the creators of this website!

      -Jennifer Bell – Smiths Falls Resident

    • What people are saying...

    • We are currently advertising with Discover Smiths Falls and it is an all around great experience and I recommend it!

      -Brian Paquette, Zendragon Martial Arts & Fitness

    • What people are saying...

    • We just moved to SF from Ottawa this past January and I find this website and FB page extremely helpful in helping us get to know the town better! Good job!

      -Stéphanie Farrell, Resident

    • What people are saying...

    • We have been fortunate to discover business opportunities as a result of our engagement with Discover Smiths Falls and we will most certainly be encouraging other businesses to talk to you about the services you offer.   Thank you for your support!

      -Amy Rensby, Magnolia Catering & Event Creations

    • What people are saying...

    • Great site… DSF is a one-stop Smiths Falls shop! Everything to see and do all in one online spot and it’s easy to use!! Whether you are a resident or a visitor, you will find it all on DSF! I was able to find a place to stay, a place to eat and something to do, all in a few clicks!

      -Bill Pilkington

Connect With Us


Comments/Feedback

Slow but steady progress for cohousing in Perth

By Sally Smith
sally@pdgmedia.ca

The reasons for talking about co-housing sound idealistic, altruistic, even touchy-feely; so Louise McDiarmid and Susan Samila were cautious in their description of the project now developing in Perth. But even through their cautious, sometimes wary answers, it’s obvious they believe it will work.

Co-housing is not a new concept – you can find it in Europe, Scandinavian countries, the United States, and throughout Canada. There are 21 established communities in British Columbia, two in Ottawa – urban to agriculture, seniors to mixed-generations, modest to elegant – and now Perth.

The concept is of a deliberate community where members commit to a mutually supportive lifestyle; in real terms, neighbours live in modest-sized apartments, enjoy a healthy social life and share common spaces, amenities and activities. The community is generally planned, owned and managed by its members.

Members don’t want to be looked after, they want to look after themselves; they want to be independent (as long as they can); they want to be socially engaged to the community, and they want their environmental footprint lessened. This is their wish list. Co-housing can make it a reality.

In Perth, the idea was bandied about by friends until one said “Let’s do it!” The first meeting was June 4, 2015 and the group meets every two weeks on Thursday nights at McMartin House, to hammer out opinions, nail down suggestions and saw through a lot of in-depth information many thought they wouldn’t be doing in their mid-60s and early 70s. But it’s coming together – slowly.

The two women say there will be individual senior units (modest in size), attached or separate with common facilities for gathering for meals and/or events. Common facilities might include a laundry area, gardens, a workshop, maybe a studio; McDiarmid says the Perth co-housing initiative will be “small, with many multi-purpose rooms.”

Samila cautions that they are still in the “informing” stage and so both are circumspect about stating definitively what will, or won’t, be included.

What’s different about co-housing than, say, apartment living, or living in a co-op? In neither of these do you own equity. Co-housing units are “built, designed and managed by people who live there,” says McDiarmid. But it’s much more than that. Co-housing living, says Samila, is a “place where people have a sense of, or a longing for, community in their living situation.”

As we grow older, community living is an answer to isolation, a practice of natural, mutual support; it bestows a sense of connectedness, while at the same time strengthens a desire to remain independent.

At the moment, the group is 20 strong; they are always looking for new members. There is a proposed name – Tay Commons Cohousing; there are committees (or circles) looking at different aspects – property, legal, design, publicity, outreach.

The plan is to secure an acre of land to build 12 units (attached or apartment-style) depending on the site. The group has consulted lawyers, builders and developers. They are looking for land and have several properties in mind. Most critical, says Samila, is the land must be “within walking distance of downtown Perth.”

And while building their own small community might seem exclusive to the rest of Perth, both McDiarmid and Samila say the future senior community wants to be connected in dynamic ways to the town and people of Perth.

The hope of the co-housing initiative members is to have it up and running in three years, but they caution once again, and laugh a little self-deprecatingly that “we’ve never done this before – we’re learning as we go.”

Why not get in on the ground floor? For information, contact Susan Samila at 264-1196, ssamila@storm.ca or Louise McDiarmid at 264-8590, louise_43@sympatico.ca. Go to the website at www.perth-cohousing-intiative.com

Photo Caption: An interested group of ‘co-housers’ exploring a possible site for a 12-unit development. Photo Credit: Submitted

Youth homelessness campaign coming to Smiths Falls, Perth, Carleton Place

Submitted

From Sept.30 to Oct. 3, businessman and entrepreneur Joe Roberts, will be pushing a shopping cart through Lanark County and Smiths Falls to raise awareness about youth homelessness. His journey for this national trek started May 1, 2016 in St. John’s Newfoundland and will end Sept. 30, 2017 in Vancouver, British Columbia. During this 9,000 km and 17-month trip, Roberts will be making hundreds of stops to get involved with local community events across the country.

The Push for Change, partnering together with Raise the Roof Canada and The National Coalition to End Youth Homelessness, are working to build a prevention framework called The Upstream Project.  The Push for Change will share funds raised while in Lanark County & Smiths Falls between the Upstream Project and the United Way Lanark County, who will distribute the funds to agencies serving homeless youth.

Why youth homelessness?
Roberts experienced homelessness himself at a young age, and transformed his difficult life to become a successful businessman and entrepreneur. He has personally experienced the power of possibility thinking in the face of some of life’s biggest obstacles, and he is dedicated to sharing this possibility mindset with others who are going through their own challenges.

The key to ending homelessness is in prevention, combined with emergency services and sustainable housing. Often we overlook the issue of prevention, but it’s the best hope for helping young people to transition safely into adulthood. It is also the most cost -effective and pragmatic approach to investing in a problem that looks like it has no end.

The facts:

  • The annual cost to keep a single youth in the shelter system is between $30,000-$40,000 – and that’s if a shelter is even available.
  • The cost of keeping a single youth in a detention centre is estimated at $250 a day, or $100,000 a year.
  • Canada’s total homeless population – estimated by government to be 150,000 and by non-governmental agencies to be as high as 300,000, is costing taxpayers as much as $7 billion annually.
  • A study completed a year ago by the Algonquin College Applied Research & Innovation Centre estimated that 45 youth are homeless in Lanark County and Smiths Falls during a given year. However, this estimate has been proven to be low. In the first seven months of 2016, 60 plus youth have contacted the Homeless Intervention and Prevention Case Managers in our communities, because they were experiencing homelessness or were at risk of becoming homeless.

Locally, partners are working on hosting a number of events over Roberts four-day stay to highlight the need to end youth homeless within Lanark County and Smiths Falls.

The Push For Change team will be in Carleton Place on Friday, Sept. 30, in Perth on Saturday, Oct.1, and Smiths Falls on Monday, Oct. 3
How to get involved
If you want to get involved with ending youth homelessness, here are some ways to do so.

Donate: Visit www.thepushforchange.com, or to give specifically to local initiatives, go towww.lanarkunitedway.com.

Take the Barefoot Challenge: Participate by texting BOOTSUWLC to 41010 to donate $10 towards preventing youth homelessness, go without your boots or shoes for one hour, and share your experience by posting pictures or videos on social media.

Walk with Joe Health & Wellness Challenge: Register as an individuals or a team, set a fundraising goal and match Joe’s steps.

Celebrity Cart: Raise $1,000 per kilometre to walk with Joe using an online crowd funding.

Donate: Visit www.thepushforchange.com, or to give specifically to local initiatives, go towww.lanarkunitedway.com.

 

Perth weekend guide: September 9 – 11

Perth Weekend Guide: September 9 – 11

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

An Inspector Calls at Good Shepherd Hall, St. James Anglican Church

2:00pm
An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestley (August 19 to September 11) is a nail-biter of a mystery in which a body has been found and everyone is a suspect. A new BBC-TV film adaptation is scheduled for 2016.
Pre-show Talks explain the history, story, background, and social/cultural context of the play and playwright and are included with the price of your ticket. Pre-show Talks are presented at 1:30pm before each matinee, and at 7:30pm before each evening performance (starting Aug 21).
Good Shepherd Hall, St. James Anglican Church
54 Beckwith St. E., Perth
Classictheatre.ca

Back to School Bike Check-ups

3:30 to 6:00 pm
Perth’s Heritage Bikes and Rentals, and The Table Community Food Centre are teaming up to offer back to school bike check ups. Though timed for students who may need their bike to get to school, everyone is welcome to bring their bike to The Table on September 9th for an assessment of any maintenance issues.
Basic repairs that can be made onsite will also be done – all free of charge. Look for the tent on the front lawn of The Table at 190 Gore St. E.
The Table Community Food Centre

Perth Duplicate Bridge Club Sectional Tournament

The Perth Duplicate Bridge Club Sectional Tournament will be taking place September 9th – 11th, 2016 at the Perth Civitan Club.
For further information, please visit: www.perth.ca or contact 613-264-0945
Perth Civitan Club
613.264.0945
www.perth.ca

McDonald’s Corners Farmers’ Market

MERA Schoolhouse grounds, McDonald’s Corners
www.lanarklocalflavour.ca/node/121

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

Perth Farmers’ Market

8:00am – 1:00pm
THE PERTH FARMERS’ MARKET takes place every Saturday morning between May 7th and October 8th, 2016, in the Tay Basin Parking Lot and around the Crystal Palace. Vendors are set-up between 8am and 1pm and offer fresh, local, organic in-season produce, plants, preserves, meat, home baking, and tons of other goodies. The Market also offers artisans and crafts, jewellry, entertainment occasionally and chance to have breakfast at the Piggin’ Out Market Cafe. This is a great way to spend a Saturday morning, getting to know your local producers in the heart of downtown Perth!

Meet and Greet – Amanda West

1:00pm – 3:00pm
Join author Amanda West at the BOOK NOOK as she discusses her new book The Pact. This fascinating novel follows one boy as he navigates growing up in Nazi Germany.
The Book Nook
http://www.downtownperthbia.ca/bia-news
https://www.facebook.com/downtownheritageperthbia/

Chopped Canada

Cheer on Nick Valliquette at the Stone Cellar restaurant in Perth, on September 10th, as he competes on Chopped Canada!
Congratulations to Nick!
http://www.downtownperthbia.ca/bia-news

An Inspector Calls at Good Shepherd Hall, St. James Anglican Church

2:00pm and 8:00pm
An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestley (August 19 to September 11) is a nail-biter of a mystery in which a body has been found and everyone is a suspect. A new BBC-TV film adaptation is scheduled for 2016.
Pre-show Talks explain the history, story, background, and social/cultural context of the play and playwright and are included with the price of your ticket. Pre-show Talks are presented at 1:30pm before each matinee, and at 7:30pm before each evening performance (starting Aug 21).
Good Shepherd Hall, St. James Anglican Church
54 Beckwith St. E., Perth
Classictheatre.ca

Perth Duplicate Bridge Club Sectional Tournament

The Perth Duplicate Bridge Club Sectional Tournament will be taking place September 9th – 11th, 2016 at the Perth Civitan Club.
For further information, please visit: www.perth.ca or contact 613-264-0945
Perth Civitan Club
613.264.0945
www.perth.ca

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11

An Inspector Calls at Good Shepherd Hall, St. James Anglican Church

2:00pm
An Inspector Calls by J.B. Priestley (August 19 to September 11) is a nail-biter of a mystery in which a body has been found and everyone is a suspect. A new BBC-TV film adaptation is scheduled for 2016.
Pre-show Talks explain the history, story, background, and social/cultural context of the play and playwright and are included with the price of your ticket. Pre-show Talks are presented at 1:30pm before each matinee, and at 7:30pm before each evening performance (starting Aug 21).
Good Shepherd Hall, St. James Anglican Church
54 Beckwith St. E., Perth
Classictheatre.ca

Perth Duplicate Bridge Club Sectional Tournament

The Perth Duplicate Bridge Club Sectional Tournament will be taking place September 9th – 11th, 2016 at the Perth Civitan Club.
For further information, please visit: www.perth.ca or contact 613-264-0945
Perth Civitan Club
613.264.0945
www.perth.ca

Perth taking action to recruit doctors to the area

By Dianne Pinder-Moss
dianne@pdgmedia.ca

Perth may not be ailing right now when it comes to the number of family physicians in the community but that prognosis could change shortly, according to the town’s mayor.

“We are fine now but, in a very short time, we may not be that way,” he stated at the Aug. 9 Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting of Perth Town Council, noting that several doctors are nearing retirement age.

Fenik told council that the opportunity had arose for Perth to share a professional physician recruiter with Smiths Falls and Brockville at a cost to the town of $10,000 for one year. This will cover one day a week, he pointed out, adding that both the Great War Memorial Hospital Foundation and Smiths Falls Community Hospital Foundation of the Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital have committed to funding physician recruitment in each of the two communities.

In addition, the mayor mentioned that he had had recent discussions with the reeves of Tay Valley and Drummond/North townships and that both were going to bring the matter before their respective councils to see if there is support for splitting the $10,000 cost with Perth in 2017.

Perth, however, isn’t waiting until then to commence the recruitment process. A motion put forward by Fenik for town council to support the recruitment of a physician recruiter at the $10,000 price tag received unanimous approval. The resolution will come before the regular meeting of town council on Aug. 30 for final approval.

During deliberation of the motion, Councillor Jim Boldt expressed his full support as he shared the experience of a family member’s difficulty in finding a family physician in town. He added that his own family doctor has already cut back on his hours in order to have some family time. Deputy Mayor John Gemmell who chaired the meeting said his physician is doing the same.

“It is a fact in the province of Ontario, doctors across the board are getting up to retirement age,” Boldt stated.

Councillor Jim Graff called the hiring “a proactive approach and I certainly support this resolution.”

When asked by Boldt whether the recruiter would have any bias for one community over another, Fenik replied that the woman who he has already met and described as “quite impressive” would be devoting one day a week specifically to the Town of Perth with Tay Valley and Drummond/North Elmsley benefitting through their geographic locations.

“She has a physician interested in moving to the Town of Perth,” the mayor mentioned.

    

Carleton Place BIA launches new online community events calendar

By Dianne Pinder-Moss
dianne@pdgmedia.ca

As a person who likes to connect people, Mark Lovell is passionate about his involvement in a new initiative to connect local residents with what is going on in Carleton Place and beyond.

The director with the Carleton Place BIA Board of Management has spearheaded the creation of a community events calendar on the BIA’s website, www.downtowncarletonplace.com.

With the BIA already being part of the social media scene for a few years through Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, the events calendar is viewed as the next evolution in the organization’s online presence.

“There seemed to be a need in the community for a go-to source for events,” explains Cathie McOrmond, project manager of the Carleton Place BIA.

The calendar, which was launched in April, utilizes Google Calendar software.

“Rather than one person being the single point of contact, we give Google permission to groups and they manage their own events,” Lovell states.

The calendar has different categories – Sports, The Arts, Live Music, Public Meetings, Community Meals, Events, and Activities and Games.

The events calendar is open to submissions from any service club, church, municipality, sporting and other community groups or businesses that organize events, as well as horse farms who want to promote public horse shows. “Also, if there are boating events, I would certainly welcome them on the calendar,” Lovell mentions.

For those wishing to be a contributor, all they need to do is email info@downtowncarletonplace.com or McOrmond at cmcormond@carletonplace.ca and provide a gmail address that is not a private account. The events calendar can also be embedded onto any website, with Valley Granite and Tile having already taken advantage of that opportunity.

Currently, the calendar lists approximately 15 events a week with that number expected to increase as the number of contributors grows. The Town of Carleton Place, Carleton Place and District Chamber of Commerce, Mississippi Mudds, Lanark County Interval House, St. George’s Anglican Church in Clayton and Slackoni’s are among those already utilizing the service.

The online events calendar was developed with two main objectives.

“The whole idea,” says the BIA project manager, “was to make it accessible for everybody and make it user friendly so that it was an easy step process for all community groups to be engaged and promote their events in the community.”

Based on the feedback Lovell has been receiving, the calendar has achieved these goals.

“It is easy, it is simple,” he has been told, adding, “non-profit organizations are really happy with it because it is free.” As an indicator of the appeal of the online events calendar, which can be found at http://downtowncarletonplace.com/community-calendar/, it is the second most visited page on the BIA website.

The community events calendar not only includes events within Carleton Place but also Beckwith Township, Mississippi Mills and other areas within Lanark County. Lovell has already reached out to the BIA in Perth and the DBA in Smiths Falls to see if they might be interested in undertaking a similar initiative.

“It would be cool if Perth and other communities would do the same thing,” he said. “Then we could merge into a county wide calendar.”

As a complement to the community events calendar, Lovell has started a social media video campaign on the BIA’s Facebook page – Downtown Carleton Place BIA. What started out as a random idea on his part has evolved due to the positive response into a weekly audio and video segment promoting events taking place in and around the downtown area.

“The BIA represents the downtown core. When you create tourism in your community, it supports everybody,” McOrmond said. “Our ultimate goal would be to bring people downtown to shop.”

Lovell is pleased with the initial response to the videos. “It sort of creates a buzz about Carleton Place,” he remarked.

Mark Lovell, a director with the Carleton Place BIA’s Board of Management, demonstrates how user-friendly the new online community events calendar on the BIA website is. Photo Credit: Dianne Pinder-Moss

Mark Lovell, a director with the Carleton Place BIA’s Board of Management, demonstrates how user-friendly the new online community events calendar on the BIA website is. Photo Credit: Dianne Pinder-Moss

Perth weekend guide: July 15 – 17

Perth Weekend Guide: July 15 – 17

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, JULY 15

Stewart Park Festival

July 14, 9:00am – July 17, 5:00pm
Four free days of music in beautiful Stewart Park, brought to you by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. This weekend concert extravaganza features local, Canadian and international entertainment, food vendors, artisans, workshops, downtown shopping specials and more. Call the BIA office at 613-267-3311; email kclarke@perth.ca or visit www.stewartparkfestival.com

Perth Through the Ages: Historic Walking Tour

11:00am
Theatrical historic walking tour for all ages celebrates Perth’s past as our heritage town celebrates its 200 history in 2016. Perfect for the whole family!
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price.
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E, Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

I Ought to Be in Pictures

2:00pm
Jun 24-Jul 17. 2pm on Wed-Sun, 8pm on Wed, Thurs, Sat.
Neil Simon’s I Ought to be in Pictures (June 24 to July 17) is a heartfelt comedy about a father and daughter rebuilding their relationship after years of disconnection.
Pre-show Talks explain the history, story, background, and social/cultural context of the play and playwright and are included with the price of your ticket. Pre-show Talks are presented at 1:30pm before each matinee, and at 7:30pm before each evening performance (starting Jun 26).
54 Beckwith St. E., Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Lonely Ghosts Walk at Matheson House

7:00pm
Throughout 200 years of the town’s history, the unsettled spirits of Perth refuse to go quietly into that good night until their stories are told. Hear their new tales this season every Friday evening at 8pm from July 1 to August 26 for this family-friendly hour-long ghost walk through Perth’s historic streets.
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E., Perth
1-877-283-1283
www.classictheatre.ca

McDonald’s Corners Farmers’ Market

MERA Schoolhouse grounds, McDonald’s Corners
www.lanarklocalflavour.ca/node/121

THE FRIDAY AFTERNOON BRIDGE CLUB

12:30pm
Meets in the Edna Green Room at McMartin House, 125 Gore St E. every Friday afternoon, officially starting at 12:30 P.M., to play social Bridge in a comfortable and friendly setting. In fact, many members like to get there an hour or two early and play Bridge with friends prior to the formal four hand bridge game competitions that start at 12:30.  There are five rounds of four-hand Bridge, with scores recorded for each individual and their partners at each table. The winners at each table rotate to the next table.  There are small prizes for the persons with the highest individual score, the second highest, and the lowest. Prizes are also awarded for the overall winner for the year. http://www.perthseniors.ca/cal2/Calendar.asp​

SATURDAY, JULY 16

Perth Farmers’ Market

8:00am – 1:00pm
THE PERTH FARMERS’ MARKET takes place every Saturday morning between May 7th and October 8th, 2016, in the Tay Basin Parking Lot and around the Crystal Palace. Vendors are set-up between 8am and 1pm and offer fresh, local, organic in-season produce, plants, preserves, meat, home baking, and tons of other goodies. The Market also offers artisans and crafts, jewellry, entertainment occasionally and chance to have breakfast at the Piggin’ Out Market Cafe. This is a great way to spend a Saturday morning, getting to know your local producers in the heart of downtown Perth!

Stewart Park Festival

July 14, 9:00am – July 17, 5:00pm
Four free days of music in beautiful Stewart Park, brought to you by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. This weekend concert extravaganza features local, Canadian and international entertainment, food vendors, artisans, workshops, downtown shopping specials and more. Call the BIA office at 613-267-3311; email kclarke@perth.ca or visit www.stewartparkfestival.com

Perth Through the Ages: Historic Walking Tour

11:00am
Theatrical historic walking tour for all ages celebrates Perth’s past as our heritage town celebrates its 200 history in 2016. Perfect for the whole family!
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price.
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E, Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Downtown Sidewalk Sale

Explore our downtown, visit our charming shops and see what makes Perth such a unique shopping experience. We offer a variety of merchandise including wonderful gifts stores, an artisan store featuring handmade items, antique and collectable stores, men’s and women’s clothing stores, children’s stores, crafts and fabric stores and a vintage record and book store.
Downtown Perth

SUNDAY, JULY 17

Stewart Park Festival

July 14, 9:00am – July 17, 5:00pm
Four free days of music in beautiful Stewart Park, brought to you by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. This weekend concert extravaganza features local, Canadian and international entertainment, food vendors, artisans, workshops, downtown shopping specials and more. Call the BIA office at 613-267-3311; email kclarke@perth.ca or visit www.stewartparkfestival.com

Great Tay Duck Race

Buy a quack for YAK. All money raised supports local youth programs. This year’s grand prize is a 12 x 16 shed donated to YAK by Algonquin College’s advanced housing course or $500 cash. Second place winner receives $300 and third place wins $200. Not only could you win awesome prizes, you will also be supporting YAK’s biggest fundraiser which helps raise very important operating cost. Without the support of the community, YAK would not be able to help youth the way we do. Thank you.
Stewart Park Festival, Perth.

Perth Through the Ages: Historic Walking Tour

11:00am
Theatrical historic walking tour for all ages celebrates Perth’s past as our heritage town celebrates its 200 history in 2016. Perfect for the whole family!
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price.
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E, Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Perth weekend guide: July 8 – 10

Perth Weekend Guide: July 8 – 10

Check out the weekend guide below to find out what is going on in your community.


FRIDAY, JULY 8

Stewart Park Festival

July 14, 9:00am – July 17, 5:00pm
Four free days of music in beautiful Stewart Park, brought to you by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. This weekend concert extravaganza features local, Canadian and international entertainment, food vendors, artisans, workshops, downtown shopping specials and more. Call the BIA office at 613-267-3311; email kclarke@perth.ca or visit www.stewartparkfestival.com

Perth Through the Ages: Historic Walking Tour

11:00am
Theatrical historic walking tour for all ages celebrates Perth’s past as our heritage town celebrates its 200 history in 2016. Perfect for the whole family!
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price.
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E, Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

I Ought to Be in Pictures

2:00pm
Jun 24-Jul 17. 2pm on Wed-Sun, 8pm on Wed, Thurs, Sat.
Neil Simon’s I Ought to be in Pictures (June 24 to July 17) is a heartfelt comedy about a father and daughter rebuilding their relationship after years of disconnection.
Pre-show Talks explain the history, story, background, and social/cultural context of the play and playwright and are included with the price of your ticket. Pre-show Talks are presented at 1:30pm before each matinee, and at 7:30pm before each evening performance (starting Jun 26).
54 Beckwith St. E., Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Del Harper Memorial Tournament

July 8, 6:00pm – July 10, 12:00pm (noon)
Perth + District Little League Association hosts the annual DEL HARPER MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT at Conlon Farm on the weekend of July 8-10, 2016. 16 teams compete for a great weekend of minor baseball.
For information please visit the website at www.perthlittleleague.ca

Lonely Ghosts Walk at Matheson House

7:00pm
Throughout 200 years of the town’s history, the unsettled spirits of Perth refuse to go quietly into that good night until their stories are told. Hear their new tales this season every Friday evening at 8pm from July 1 to August 26 for this family-friendly hour-long ghost walk through Perth’s historic streets.
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E., Perth
1-877-283-1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Barndoor Productions Presents: Janet Coward’s, The Great Perth Temperance Soiree

July 8, 7:30pm – July 9, 9:30pm
THE Great Perth Temperance Soiree is drawn word for word from the pages of the Perth Courier from 1834 to about 1900. It is the story of the anti-drinking movement in Perth, its rise and fall and its follies. And it is full of music and fun–and just a little bit of seriousness too. Above all, its an entertaining dive into. the pages of Perth’s past. www.barndoorproductions.ca

McDonald’s Corners Farmers’ Market

MERA Schoolhouse grounds, McDonald’s Corners
www.lanarklocalflavour.ca/node/121

SATURDAY, JULY 9

Celebrate Balderson

CELEBRATE BALDERSON is an event taking place Saturday and Sunday, July 9th and 10th, 2016, which promotes the dairy heritage of the area and Balderson’s most famous export, The Mammoth Cheese, which was produced from the milk of local farmers and weighed in at 22,000 pounds. For further information check the website at www.2016lanarkcountytourism.ca. or http://www.dnetownship.ca

Perth Farmers’ Market

8:00am – 1:00pm
THE PERTH FARMERS’ MARKET takes place every Saturday morning between May 7th and October 8th, 2016, in the Tay Basin Parking Lot and around the Crystal Palace. Vendors are set-up between 8am and 1pm and offer fresh, local, organic in-season produce, plants, preserves, meat, home baking, and tons of other goodies. The Market also offers artisans and crafts, jewellry, entertainment occasionally and chance to have breakfast at the Piggin’ Out Market Cafe. This is a great way to spend a Saturday morning, getting to know your local producers in the heart of downtown Perth!

Stewart Park Festival

July 14, 9:00am – July 17, 5:00pm
Four free days of music in beautiful Stewart Park, brought to you by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. This weekend concert extravaganza features local, Canadian and international entertainment, food vendors, artisans, workshops, downtown shopping specials and more. Call the BIA office at 613-267-3311; email kclarke@perth.ca or visit www.stewartparkfestival.com

Perth Through the Ages: Historic Walking Tour

11:00am
Theatrical historic walking tour for all ages celebrates Perth’s past as our heritage town celebrates its 200 history in 2016. Perfect for the whole family!
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price.
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E, Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Pie in the sky

Pie in the Sky
Highway 7 & County Road 36,
Maberly
www.maberlyagsociety.ca

Del Harper Memorial Tournament

July 8, 6:00pm – July 10, 12:00pm (noon)
Perth + District Little League Association hosts the annual DEL HARPER MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT at Conlon Farm on the weekend of July 8-10, 2016. 16 teams compete for a great weekend of minor baseball.
For information please visit the website at www.perthlittleleague.ca

Barndoor Productions Presents: Janet Coward’s, The Great Perth Temperance Soiree

July 8, 7:30pm – July 9, 9:30pm
THE Great Perth Temperance Soiree is drawn word for word from the pages of the Perth Courier from 1834 to about 1900. It is the story of the anti-drinking movement in Perth, its rise and fall and its follies. And it is full of music and fun–and just a little bit of seriousness too. Above all, its an entertaining dive into. the pages of Perth’s past. www.barndoorproductions.ca

SUNDAY, JULY 10

Stewart Park Festival

July 14, 9:00am – July 17, 5:00pm
Four free days of music in beautiful Stewart Park, brought to you by the Downtown Heritage Perth BIA. This weekend concert extravaganza features local, Canadian and international entertainment, food vendors, artisans, workshops, downtown shopping specials and more. Call the BIA office at 613-267-3311; email kclarke@perth.ca or visit www.stewartparkfestival.com

Ladies of the Tay vendor event

10:00am – 3:00pm
Join the Ladies of the Tay and 30 other Artisans, Crafters and Vendors for our first Summer Pop up Market on the Tay July 10 2016 10 am to 3 pm. For more information email ladiesofthetay@gmail.com

Perth Through the Ages: Historic Walking Tour

11:00am
Theatrical historic walking tour for all ages celebrates Perth’s past as our heritage town celebrates its 200 history in 2016. Perfect for the whole family!
$15; $12 for Classic Theatre Festival ticketholders (proof of purchase required); children aged 12 and under pay 50%-off adult price.
Matheson House
11 Gore St. E, Perth
1.877.283.1283
www.classictheatre.ca

Del Harper Memorial Tournament

July 8, 6:00pm – July 10, 12:00pm (noon)
Perth + District Little League Association hosts the annual DEL HARPER MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT at Conlon Farm on the weekend of July 8-10, 2016. 16 teams compete for a great weekend of minor baseball.
For information please visit the website at www.perthlittleleague.ca

Perth Florist Receives Ottawa Wedding Award

Perth-Terry O’Hearn

Krista Mackler, owner of Kelly’s Flowers and Gift Boutique, was shocked to learn she had won the People’s Choice Award for Best Florist at the Ottawa Wedding Awards held at the Ottawa Conference and Event Centre April 21.

Although Mackler has only owned the business for two years, she has worked there for 18 years.  She said “It was an honour to be up against all those amazing and talented florists in Ottawa who work at prestigious venues on a regular basis.”

Kari Clarke, co-ordinator of the Perth BIA, who also attended the event along with Perth Tourism Manager Karen Rennie, noted that “Krista competed against florists from all over the Ottawa area. This is a big deal for Perth as well, since we are known as the ‘Wedding Capital of Eastern Ontario’ ”.  Clarke also mentioned that “Krista has used her passion for flowers to create a very successful business in our community.  Kelly’s Flowers and Gift Boutique is a wonderful asset.”

In a recent story following the nomination announcement, Hometown News reporter Dianne Pinder-Moss noted that it had been four years since Mayor John Fenik had proclaimed the Wedding Capital title for Perth, and the number of couples choosing wedding venues here continues to grow.  The story also quoted Shannon Baillon, Perth’s Director of Community Services:  “The wedding industry is very important to Perth as it brings hundreds of people to the town every year and supports many of our businesses.”

Other local nominations were the Crystal Palace and Perth Manor Boutique Hotel in the “Reception Venue Beyond Ottawa” category.  It was the second year of nomination for Perth Manor.

Mackler went on to say that she wanted to “thank everyone who nominated me and voted for me.  The people of Perth and area are so supportive.”

Perth fountains to have extended hours

By Dianne Pinder-Moss – Perth

The website of Perth Outfitters is filled with photographs of people paddling underneath the fountains in the Tay Basin.

And now there will be an extra hour each day over the next few months for paddlers to create these photographic memories thanks to a motion approved by Perth Town Council at its Committee of the Whole (COW) meeting on April 12.

A recommendation directing staff to turn the fountains off at 8 p.m. each day received unanimous approval from council. The resolution will come before council for final approval at its regular meeting on April 26.

Having recently sent a letter to town council requesting an extension of the hours from the previous 7 p.m. turnoff, the owners of Perth Outfitters are overjoyed with the decision.

“That’s great news,” said Ian Pearson who along with his wife Jeanie Brummitt operate the outdoors business on Craig Street. “We can’t tell you how many people on a hot summer’s day, prior to going to dinner or after dinner, love to go into the basin to the fountains.”

Entering its fourth full season in business, Perth Outfitters has had more than 10,000 paddlers — canoeists, kayakers and stand-up paddle boarders — from 30 different countries, as well as the local area, utilize its services with the 15-minute paddle to the Tay Basin being the most popular route.

“The majority of our out-of-town paddlers enjoy that premier five-star route,” Brummitt mentioned.

In their correspondence to the town, the couple shared the disappointment expressed by paddlers in previous years when they learned that the fountains were being shut off so early. Likewise, they said they had heard from many local residents who enjoyed the fountains in the evenings and felt they should be left on for visitors who go for walks after dinner.

“It (the fountains) is one of the main tourist attractions in Perth,” Brummitt said in a telephone interview.

Kari Clarke, the co-ordinator of the Perth BIA, agrees. “The fountains are a major tourist attraction in our downtown, and an economic draw for the Town of Perth,” she said. “They offer a unique experience for our visitors. Their presence creates an opportunity for both residents and tourists to visit one of our many restaurants, enjoy an evening stroll through the Tay Basin and listen to the calming sounds and peaceful atmosphere that the fountains create.”

Each year, the fountains are turned on in April prior to the Festival of the Maples and off at Thanksgiving with a start time of 8 a.m. each day.

During council’s discussion of the issue, Mayor John Fenik said he would like to see a resolution that can be maintained going forward rather than the issue being revisited almost every year. On a recommendation from Councillor Ed McPherson, the motion approved states that the subject shall not be discussed again until 2025.

All motions and bylaws approved at the COW meeting will come before the regular meeting of town council on April 26 for final approval.

Photo courtesy of Perth Outfitters
This photo from a previous year shows paddlers underneath the fountains in the Tay Basin.

Three Perth nominations for Ottawa Wedding Awards

By Dianne Pinder-Moss

Talk about a marriage made in branding heaven.

In the four years since Mayor John Fenik proclaimed the Town  of Perth to be “the wedding capital of Eastern Ontario,” the number of couples saying “I do” to getting married here is continuing to grow.

“The wedding industry is very important to Perth as it brings hundreds of people to the town every year and supports many of our businesses,” Shannon Baillon, Director of Community Services with the Town of Perth told the HomeTown News. “In 2015, the number of weddings at Town venues increased by 40 per cent from 2014, which indicates that our marketing and partnerships with Perth businesses to promote Perth as the Wedding Capital of Eastern Ontario is working.”

And now a town-owned reception site, as well as another venue and a florist have been nominated for the People’s Choice section of the Ottawa Wedding Awards. The glass enclosed Crystal Palace received a nomination in the “Reception Venue Beyond Ottawa” category. Also nominated in that category was the Perth Manor Boutique Hotel with Kelly’s Flowers and Gift Boutique being a nominee in the Florist category.

This is the second year that the Perth Manor has been nominated and Gordon Craig who co-owns with his wife Linda the stately Victorian home and grounds on Drummond Street West says the recognition is greatly appreciated.

“It is great,” he remarked, adding “it will feel even better if we won.”

Kari Clarke, co-ordinator of the Perth BIA, says the BIA is thrilled that one of its members, Kelly’s Flowers, is an award nominee.

“Krista (Mackler, owner and designer) has used her passion for flowers to create a very successful business in our community,” Clarke stated. “Kelly’s Flowers and Gift Boutique is a wonderful asset to our community. It is an honour for her to be recognized and nominated for this award and we wish her the best of luck.”

According to the rules and regulations section of the awards, nominees must be associated “with a registered company that performs its service for the Ottawa-Gatineau region or within 1.5 hours from Ottawa.”

The public had an opportunity to vote online for their favourite nominee in the more than 20 different categories until Feb. 26. Temple’s Sugar Bush was the recipient of the 2015 award for Reception Venue Beyond Ottawa.

The 2016 award winners will be announced at the awards night being held on April 21 at the Ottawa Conference and Event Centre. Clarke and Perth Tourism Manager Karen Rennie will both be attending the event.

"Come experience our world-class destination on the banks of the Rideau Canal"